Issue #

125

|

Volume

7

June 29, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Carnival releases their new sanitation protocols
  • Seabourn announces fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 itineraries
  • Spanish cruise line Pullmantur declares bankruptcy amid global cruise shutdown
  • Norway Enables Coastal Cruising
  • Cruise Ships Find Shelter in Var Provence
  • The Post-Coronavirus Cruise? Not Ready to Sail

Cover Image by:

Carnival releases their new sanitation protocols

“Carnival Cruise Line’s highest responsibilities include the health and safety of our guests and crew. Coronavirus is a fluid situation and we continue to work closely with public health experts and the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), to monitor, screen and implement best practices to protect the health of our guests and crew as it relates to COVID-19 (coronavirus). Our monitoring, screening and operational protocols are designed to be flexible so that we can effectively adapt to changes as they occur.”

Read more….

 

Seabourn announces fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 itineraries

“Seabourn Cruises announced its worldwide itineraries for fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 seasons. The new programs include a total of 56 unique sailings to hidden harbors, marquee ports, yachting playgrounds, and must-experience destinations, some of which accessible only by smaller vessels. The fall 2021-winter/spring cruise 2022 seasons feature significant opportunities for luxury passengers to discover the Extraordinary Worlds of Seabourn with nearly 100 departures of 7 to 36 days in length. The ultra-luxury ships are scheduled to call at interesting and fascinating destinations in Southeast Asia, India, Africa, Arabia, Australia & New Zealand, the Panama Canal, the Caribbean, Central America, Canada & New England.”

Read more...

 

Spanish cruise line Pullmantur declares bankruptcy amid global cruise shutdown

“The Royal Caribbean-owned Spanish cruise line Pullmantur has filed for insolvency, according to a statement from Cruises Investment Holding, which owns 51% of the line. Cruises Investment Holding and Royal Caribbean Group said they have filed for the reorganization of Pullmantur under the terms of Spanish insolvency laws and placed all three of its cruise ships into cold lay-up.” 

Read more….

 

Norway Enables Coastal Cruising

“The Norwegian government has officially announced that it will allow “Hurtigruten and other cruise” lines to carry foreign passengers along the coast of Norway. The ruling is so far until July 20, 2020. Ships are not allowed to make port calls or land passengers or crew. However, they will be able to offer activities in Norwegian waters, such as kayaking, using the ships’ equipment. Hurtigruten plans to carry German guests who will not leave the ship, but instead enjoy expedition activities such as zodiac tours and kayaking. In order to do coastal sailings, cruise lines must also submit COVID-19 protocols for approval by Norwegian authorities before they are allowed to sail.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Find Shelter in Var Provence

“A number of cruise ships have found shelter for lay up in Var Provence, with the Silver Explorer arriving last weekend in Toulon Bay and becoming the third ship docked at the La Seyne-sur-Mer cruise terminal, alongside the Silver Cloud and Club Med 2. This is a first for La Seyne cruise terminal, even though these ships are not active but are waiting to resume their service, which was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a statement. The Silver Explorer is berthed on the northern part of the pier having joined the Silver Cloud which arrived from the UK on May 31.” 

Read more

 

The Post-Coronavirus Cruise? Not Ready to Sail

“Data shows that there were far more cases of Covid-19 on cruise ships than have been reported, but the companies and the C.D.C. have yet to establish how the boats can come back.  W. Bradford Gary spent 10 days trapped inside a cruise ship cabin off the coast of Brazil in March while health authorities in several countries scrambled to figure out what to do with a vessel full of older people who had potentially been exposed to the coronavirus. But when faced with the question of whether he’d ever cruise again, he doesn’t hesitate. “We are very anxious to get back on board,” he said, and he believes he’s not alone: “There are people like us who want to do this.”  Mr. Gary, 70, a retired corporate executive who lives in Palm Beach, Fla., imagines the cruise ship of the near future equipped with special disinfecting ultraviolet lights and air flow contraptions commonly used in sterile laboratories. He envisions larger cabins, fewer passengers and a lot of more outdoor spaces. “We want to know everything is safe,” he said.  That is a big order.  With more than 20 million passengers a year, the $45 billion global cruise industry has a particularly vexing challenge: Its most loyal customers, older people, also happen to be the key demographic at risk for the new illness that has swept the planet, killing more than 450,000 people. Cruises also have the very things that help the coronavirus spread: large gatherings, confined spaces and workers who live in tight shared quarters.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

125

|

Volume

7

June 29, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Carnival releases their new sanitation protocols
  • Seabourn announces fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 itineraries
  • Spanish cruise line Pullmantur declares bankruptcy amid global cruise shutdown
  • Norway Enables Coastal Cruising
  • Cruise Ships Find Shelter in Var Provence
  • The Post-Coronavirus Cruise? Not Ready to Sail

Cover Image by:

Carnival releases their new sanitation protocols

“Carnival Cruise Line’s highest responsibilities include the health and safety of our guests and crew. Coronavirus is a fluid situation and we continue to work closely with public health experts and the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), to monitor, screen and implement best practices to protect the health of our guests and crew as it relates to COVID-19 (coronavirus). Our monitoring, screening and operational protocols are designed to be flexible so that we can effectively adapt to changes as they occur.”

Read more….

 

Seabourn announces fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 itineraries

“Seabourn Cruises announced its worldwide itineraries for fall 2021 and winter/spring 2022 seasons. The new programs include a total of 56 unique sailings to hidden harbors, marquee ports, yachting playgrounds, and must-experience destinations, some of which accessible only by smaller vessels. The fall 2021-winter/spring cruise 2022 seasons feature significant opportunities for luxury passengers to discover the Extraordinary Worlds of Seabourn with nearly 100 departures of 7 to 36 days in length. The ultra-luxury ships are scheduled to call at interesting and fascinating destinations in Southeast Asia, India, Africa, Arabia, Australia & New Zealand, the Panama Canal, the Caribbean, Central America, Canada & New England.”

Read more...

 

Spanish cruise line Pullmantur declares bankruptcy amid global cruise shutdown

“The Royal Caribbean-owned Spanish cruise line Pullmantur has filed for insolvency, according to a statement from Cruises Investment Holding, which owns 51% of the line. Cruises Investment Holding and Royal Caribbean Group said they have filed for the reorganization of Pullmantur under the terms of Spanish insolvency laws and placed all three of its cruise ships into cold lay-up.” 

Read more….

 

Norway Enables Coastal Cruising

“The Norwegian government has officially announced that it will allow “Hurtigruten and other cruise” lines to carry foreign passengers along the coast of Norway. The ruling is so far until July 20, 2020. Ships are not allowed to make port calls or land passengers or crew. However, they will be able to offer activities in Norwegian waters, such as kayaking, using the ships’ equipment. Hurtigruten plans to carry German guests who will not leave the ship, but instead enjoy expedition activities such as zodiac tours and kayaking. In order to do coastal sailings, cruise lines must also submit COVID-19 protocols for approval by Norwegian authorities before they are allowed to sail.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Find Shelter in Var Provence

“A number of cruise ships have found shelter for lay up in Var Provence, with the Silver Explorer arriving last weekend in Toulon Bay and becoming the third ship docked at the La Seyne-sur-Mer cruise terminal, alongside the Silver Cloud and Club Med 2. This is a first for La Seyne cruise terminal, even though these ships are not active but are waiting to resume their service, which was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a statement. The Silver Explorer is berthed on the northern part of the pier having joined the Silver Cloud which arrived from the UK on May 31.” 

Read more

 

The Post-Coronavirus Cruise? Not Ready to Sail

“Data shows that there were far more cases of Covid-19 on cruise ships than have been reported, but the companies and the C.D.C. have yet to establish how the boats can come back.  W. Bradford Gary spent 10 days trapped inside a cruise ship cabin off the coast of Brazil in March while health authorities in several countries scrambled to figure out what to do with a vessel full of older people who had potentially been exposed to the coronavirus. But when faced with the question of whether he’d ever cruise again, he doesn’t hesitate. “We are very anxious to get back on board,” he said, and he believes he’s not alone: “There are people like us who want to do this.”  Mr. Gary, 70, a retired corporate executive who lives in Palm Beach, Fla., imagines the cruise ship of the near future equipped with special disinfecting ultraviolet lights and air flow contraptions commonly used in sterile laboratories. He envisions larger cabins, fewer passengers and a lot of more outdoor spaces. “We want to know everything is safe,” he said.  That is a big order.  With more than 20 million passengers a year, the $45 billion global cruise industry has a particularly vexing challenge: Its most loyal customers, older people, also happen to be the key demographic at risk for the new illness that has swept the planet, killing more than 450,000 people. Cruises also have the very things that help the coronavirus spread: large gatherings, confined spaces and workers who live in tight shared quarters.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

June 29, 2020

Carnival releases their new sanitation protocols

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
Latest POSTS