Issue #

122

|

Volume

7

June 26, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Could Covid-19 Be the Death of the Interior Cabin?
  • Ship Architect Gives Sneak Peek of Cruise Changes: Outdoor Theatres, Isolation Centre’s and No Interior Cabins
  • Coral Expeditions: New Health Protocols and Domestic Sailing Plan
  • Hurtigruten Resumes Cruising
  • Your favorite cruise ship may never come back: 23 classic vessels that could be laid-up, sold or scrapped
  • Virgin's Scarlet Lady sets sail on a Transatlantic voyage to repatriate remaining crew Aussie Cruising Could Start in June
  • Will Australian Cruising be Halted until 2021, Costing 13,000 Jobs?
  • American Cruise Lines pushes back Mississippi relaunch

Cover Image by:

Could Covid-19 Be the Death of the Interior Cabin?

“It’s been a staple of the big cruise ship lines for decades.  Whether you’re travelling with the kids, on a weekend away with friends, or as a solo cruiser, the interior cabin has become a popular choice because of its affordability. But with strict health protocols expected to come into play in the next few months and ships expected to sail with fewer passengers, lines are rethinking the future of the interior cabin, post COVID-19. And in particular, those with four bunks. Some lines are expected to offer balcony upgrades to wean people off their low-priced interior rooms.  The result may be higher prices, though few would confirm this.  Getting passengers back on-board post pandemic without special offers and deals would certainly challenge cruise line marketers. The larger, more contemporary lines like Royal Caribbean, P&O Cruises Australia, Carnival Cruise Line and Norwegian Cruise Line, have a raft of interior cabins, which attract young families and groups of friends. The lines have told Cruise Passenger that they are looking at different options to make sure they follow guidelines imposed by the CDC, as well as ensure the health and safety of passengers. Nothing is off the table.” 

Read more…

 

Ship Architect Gives Sneak Peek of Cruise Changes: Outdoor Theatres, Isolation Centre’s and No Interior Cabins

“One of the world’s leading ship design consultancies is in talks with two lines about implementing changes to their ships that will be the blueprint for future cruising. They predict a very different cruise experience to what we know and a massive overhaul of the industry. AMK Architecture & Design, a Greek firm that specializes in hotel and cruise ship interiors, has worked on more than 120 marine-based projects for lines like Celebrity and Costa.” 

Read more...

 

Coral Expeditions: New Health Protocols and Domestic Sailing Plan

“Coral Expeditions has launched its newly developed health and safety management plan as it prepares for a return to operations, according to a plan. The resumption plans will include a revised sailing schedule focused on nature-based expeditions in Australia’s remote coastal wilderness, the company said.  “Not all cruising is the same. Our small Australian-flagged ships follow national safety and health protocols at all times. With these added new measures, we will further reduce passenger density, and operate at the highest and most vigilant level of safety possible” said Group General Manager, Mark Fifield. “The well-being of our guests and crew has always come first over our 35-year history”. The SailSAFE protocols have been developed over the last six weeks in partnership with health emergency specialist, Respond Global, who have conducted full fleet inspections in Cairns and developed a purpose-designed plan around the small ship expedition experience. These protocols, together with the 100-passenger limit for all departures, limited community interactions on shore visits, and a 100 percent domestic Australian passenger and crew mix, are designed to create a secure atmosphere for guests in the current environment, the company said. The SailSAFE protocols focus on three key pillars:

Prevention: A robust and mandatory screening protocol for all guests, crew, and vessel prior to embarkation with a view to ensuring voyages are 100% COVID-free prior to sailing.

Mitigation: Detailed processes and thorough reinforcement of the prevention actions, with measures carried out during pre-boarding, onboard and post-cruise.

Response: A detailed plan focused on patient care, management of passengers and thorough company and vessel protocols with shoreside and health authority support.” 

Read more

 

Hurtigruten Resumes Cruising

“This week, Hurtigruten’s Ms. Finnmarken set sail from Bergen on a 12-day Original Coastal Voyage on the coast of Norway. With mostly Danish and Norwegian holidaymakers on board, this is the first-time passengers have been able to take a full coastal cruise since the COVID-19 pandemic. “Gradually restarting operations in Norway is the natural first step towards a return to full operations,” says Damian Perry, Managing Director Hurtigruten Asia Pacific. “Our staff and crew can’t wait to welcome guests back on board again.” Throughout the pandemic, Hurtigruten continued to sail two ships along the Norwegian coast, providing an essential service to the Norwegian people, but this is the first time the full coastal itinerary has been available.” 

Read more...

 

Your favorite cruise ship may never come back: 23 classic vessels that could be laid-up, sold or scrapped

“Brace yourselves, cruise fans: Some of your favorite ships could soon be heading to the chopping block. With most cruise departures around the world halted due to coronavirus concerns, and a quick comeback for cruising no longer in the cards, some of the industry’s biggest players are starting to talk about permanently retiring parts of their fleets. On Thursday, cruise giant Carnival Corporation — the world’s biggest cruise company with around 100 ships — said in a regulatory filing that it had preliminary agreements to dispose of six of the vessels in the next 90 days. It said it also was working to remove additional ships from its fleet.” 

Read more..

And at: https://www.yachtworld.com/boats-for-sale/type-power/class-power-cruise-ship/

  

Virgin's Scarlet Lady sets sail on a Transatlantic voyage to repatriate remaining crew

“Virgin Voyages' Scarlet Lady ship departed from Port Miami Florida on Tuesday, June 23, and set sail on a Transatlantic cruise back to Europe. Scarlet will be repositioned back to Europe where she is scheduled to arrive on July 6 at her birthplace Genoa, Italy. There are 270 crew members onboard the ship waiting to be repatriated and all of them have been tested for Coronavirus (COVID-19). Scarlet Lady is officially COVID-free. However, despite the negative test results, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) did not change the status of the ship and Virgin Voyages is still unable to get its crew members on commercial flights to be repatriated back home. The crew will be repatriated on flights once the liner arrives in Europe.” 

Read more...

 

Aussie Cruising Could Start in June

“Expedition cruising in the Kimberley could be the first to kick start the industry as domestic travel restrictions lift in early June, Sarina Bratton, chairman of French luxury cruise company Ponant told Cruise Passenger in an exclusive interview. Ms Bratton, a veteran of the cruise industry and the only cruise representative on the Tourism Restart Taskforce, was speaking after the group released a timeframe mapping out the reopening of domestic tourism in June, and a proposed full restart in July.” 

Read more

 

Will Australian Cruising be Halted until 2021, Costing 13,000 Jobs?

“Reading the tea leaves about when we’ll be able to get back to cruising is a little like Kremlin watching during the cold war:  it wasn’t so much what they said, but who was saying it.  So, when Simon Birmingham, Federal Tourism Minister, says he doesn’t expect our borders to be open to international tourism before the end of the year, he is also saying don’t expect to see foreign flagged cruise ships back at our ports before then. “I do sadly think that in terms of open tourist-related travel in or out of Australia, that remains quite some distance off,” Mr Birmingham said.  “Just because of the practicalities of the volumes that are involved and the need for us to first and foremost keep putting health first.” Asked whether that meant the borders would not reopen until next year, he said: “I think that is more likely the case.” If foreign guests and crews can’t come here, our regular armada of ships will be forced to stay at anchor. Though there are plans for local cruising, how to deal with crew is still an open question.”

Read more

 

American Cruise Lines pushes back Mississippi relaunch

“American Cruise Lines, which was forced last week to cancel its planned restart in the Pacific Northwest due to a spike in Covid-19 cases in Oregon, said its first sailing will now be in July on the Mississippi River.

The company said the American Harmony will cruise from Memphis to New Orleans on July 12 instead of June 28 as previously announced. A resumption of sailings on the Columbia and Snake rivers will depend on when the governor of Oregon eases pandemic-related restrictions, ACL said.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

122

|

Volume

7

June 26, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Could Covid-19 Be the Death of the Interior Cabin?
  • Ship Architect Gives Sneak Peek of Cruise Changes: Outdoor Theatres, Isolation Centre’s and No Interior Cabins
  • Coral Expeditions: New Health Protocols and Domestic Sailing Plan
  • Hurtigruten Resumes Cruising
  • Your favorite cruise ship may never come back: 23 classic vessels that could be laid-up, sold or scrapped
  • Virgin's Scarlet Lady sets sail on a Transatlantic voyage to repatriate remaining crew Aussie Cruising Could Start in June
  • Will Australian Cruising be Halted until 2021, Costing 13,000 Jobs?
  • American Cruise Lines pushes back Mississippi relaunch

Cover Image by:

Could Covid-19 Be the Death of the Interior Cabin?

“It’s been a staple of the big cruise ship lines for decades.  Whether you’re travelling with the kids, on a weekend away with friends, or as a solo cruiser, the interior cabin has become a popular choice because of its affordability. But with strict health protocols expected to come into play in the next few months and ships expected to sail with fewer passengers, lines are rethinking the future of the interior cabin, post COVID-19. And in particular, those with four bunks. Some lines are expected to offer balcony upgrades to wean people off their low-priced interior rooms.  The result may be higher prices, though few would confirm this.  Getting passengers back on-board post pandemic without special offers and deals would certainly challenge cruise line marketers. The larger, more contemporary lines like Royal Caribbean, P&O Cruises Australia, Carnival Cruise Line and Norwegian Cruise Line, have a raft of interior cabins, which attract young families and groups of friends. The lines have told Cruise Passenger that they are looking at different options to make sure they follow guidelines imposed by the CDC, as well as ensure the health and safety of passengers. Nothing is off the table.” 

Read more…

 

Ship Architect Gives Sneak Peek of Cruise Changes: Outdoor Theatres, Isolation Centre’s and No Interior Cabins

“One of the world’s leading ship design consultancies is in talks with two lines about implementing changes to their ships that will be the blueprint for future cruising. They predict a very different cruise experience to what we know and a massive overhaul of the industry. AMK Architecture & Design, a Greek firm that specializes in hotel and cruise ship interiors, has worked on more than 120 marine-based projects for lines like Celebrity and Costa.” 

Read more...

 

Coral Expeditions: New Health Protocols and Domestic Sailing Plan

“Coral Expeditions has launched its newly developed health and safety management plan as it prepares for a return to operations, according to a plan. The resumption plans will include a revised sailing schedule focused on nature-based expeditions in Australia’s remote coastal wilderness, the company said.  “Not all cruising is the same. Our small Australian-flagged ships follow national safety and health protocols at all times. With these added new measures, we will further reduce passenger density, and operate at the highest and most vigilant level of safety possible” said Group General Manager, Mark Fifield. “The well-being of our guests and crew has always come first over our 35-year history”. The SailSAFE protocols have been developed over the last six weeks in partnership with health emergency specialist, Respond Global, who have conducted full fleet inspections in Cairns and developed a purpose-designed plan around the small ship expedition experience. These protocols, together with the 100-passenger limit for all departures, limited community interactions on shore visits, and a 100 percent domestic Australian passenger and crew mix, are designed to create a secure atmosphere for guests in the current environment, the company said. The SailSAFE protocols focus on three key pillars:

Prevention: A robust and mandatory screening protocol for all guests, crew, and vessel prior to embarkation with a view to ensuring voyages are 100% COVID-free prior to sailing.

Mitigation: Detailed processes and thorough reinforcement of the prevention actions, with measures carried out during pre-boarding, onboard and post-cruise.

Response: A detailed plan focused on patient care, management of passengers and thorough company and vessel protocols with shoreside and health authority support.” 

Read more

 

Hurtigruten Resumes Cruising

“This week, Hurtigruten’s Ms. Finnmarken set sail from Bergen on a 12-day Original Coastal Voyage on the coast of Norway. With mostly Danish and Norwegian holidaymakers on board, this is the first-time passengers have been able to take a full coastal cruise since the COVID-19 pandemic. “Gradually restarting operations in Norway is the natural first step towards a return to full operations,” says Damian Perry, Managing Director Hurtigruten Asia Pacific. “Our staff and crew can’t wait to welcome guests back on board again.” Throughout the pandemic, Hurtigruten continued to sail two ships along the Norwegian coast, providing an essential service to the Norwegian people, but this is the first time the full coastal itinerary has been available.” 

Read more...

 

Your favorite cruise ship may never come back: 23 classic vessels that could be laid-up, sold or scrapped

“Brace yourselves, cruise fans: Some of your favorite ships could soon be heading to the chopping block. With most cruise departures around the world halted due to coronavirus concerns, and a quick comeback for cruising no longer in the cards, some of the industry’s biggest players are starting to talk about permanently retiring parts of their fleets. On Thursday, cruise giant Carnival Corporation — the world’s biggest cruise company with around 100 ships — said in a regulatory filing that it had preliminary agreements to dispose of six of the vessels in the next 90 days. It said it also was working to remove additional ships from its fleet.” 

Read more..

And at: https://www.yachtworld.com/boats-for-sale/type-power/class-power-cruise-ship/

  

Virgin's Scarlet Lady sets sail on a Transatlantic voyage to repatriate remaining crew

“Virgin Voyages' Scarlet Lady ship departed from Port Miami Florida on Tuesday, June 23, and set sail on a Transatlantic cruise back to Europe. Scarlet will be repositioned back to Europe where she is scheduled to arrive on July 6 at her birthplace Genoa, Italy. There are 270 crew members onboard the ship waiting to be repatriated and all of them have been tested for Coronavirus (COVID-19). Scarlet Lady is officially COVID-free. However, despite the negative test results, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) did not change the status of the ship and Virgin Voyages is still unable to get its crew members on commercial flights to be repatriated back home. The crew will be repatriated on flights once the liner arrives in Europe.” 

Read more...

 

Aussie Cruising Could Start in June

“Expedition cruising in the Kimberley could be the first to kick start the industry as domestic travel restrictions lift in early June, Sarina Bratton, chairman of French luxury cruise company Ponant told Cruise Passenger in an exclusive interview. Ms Bratton, a veteran of the cruise industry and the only cruise representative on the Tourism Restart Taskforce, was speaking after the group released a timeframe mapping out the reopening of domestic tourism in June, and a proposed full restart in July.” 

Read more

 

Will Australian Cruising be Halted until 2021, Costing 13,000 Jobs?

“Reading the tea leaves about when we’ll be able to get back to cruising is a little like Kremlin watching during the cold war:  it wasn’t so much what they said, but who was saying it.  So, when Simon Birmingham, Federal Tourism Minister, says he doesn’t expect our borders to be open to international tourism before the end of the year, he is also saying don’t expect to see foreign flagged cruise ships back at our ports before then. “I do sadly think that in terms of open tourist-related travel in or out of Australia, that remains quite some distance off,” Mr Birmingham said.  “Just because of the practicalities of the volumes that are involved and the need for us to first and foremost keep putting health first.” Asked whether that meant the borders would not reopen until next year, he said: “I think that is more likely the case.” If foreign guests and crews can’t come here, our regular armada of ships will be forced to stay at anchor. Though there are plans for local cruising, how to deal with crew is still an open question.”

Read more

 

American Cruise Lines pushes back Mississippi relaunch

“American Cruise Lines, which was forced last week to cancel its planned restart in the Pacific Northwest due to a spike in Covid-19 cases in Oregon, said its first sailing will now be in July on the Mississippi River.

The company said the American Harmony will cruise from Memphis to New Orleans on July 12 instead of June 28 as previously announced. A resumption of sailings on the Columbia and Snake rivers will depend on when the governor of Oregon eases pandemic-related restrictions, ACL said.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

June 26, 2020

Could Covid-19 Be the Death of the Interior Cabin?

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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