Issue #

231

|

Volume

15

February 19, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Developing the new protocols for a ‘new normal’
  • Victory getting northern exposure with Alaska sailings
  • Baltic Ports Ready for 2021 Cruise Season, Ask Authorities to Cooperate
  • Another Pause in Australia Operations for Carnival Cruise Line
  • Accommodation Vessels Set to Play Key Drydock Role
  • Immigration New Zealand Throws Wrench into Ponant's February Cruises
  • A Caribbean paradise with a lot to offer
  • Coral Expeditions Marks Tasmanian Restart to Summer Expedition Season
  • Royal Caribbean chooses Barbados as new homeport
  • Rostock-Warnemünde Confident for Q2 Restart of Cruising
  • Why Ships Use Port and Starboard Instead of Left and Right? (Video)
  • Cruise lines must ‘tell their story’ to reassure public and politicians
  • SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

Cover Image by:

Think rocket ship. Photo by Bill Jelen on Unsplash

Developing the new protocols for a ‘new normal’

Europe’s diversity and year-round opportunities, coupled with pioneering cruise lines, could speed up the return to normality of the continent’s cruise industry.  Europe is a diverse continent that has much to offer – its location and mild seasonal changes make it accessible year-round and enable our ports to offer a variety of opportunities to visitors. Our members are divided into four regions which all have their unique selling points: Atlantic Europe; the Baltic; UK and Ireland; and Norway, Iceland and the Faroe Islands.  With the current challenges created by Covid-19, we are working to support ports, cruise lines and the broader industry in getting back to a ‘new normal’ where these opportunities are, once again, available to cruise guests. We aim to bring the positive and encouraging news of start-ups to our members and the industry in a time when we are all feeling the effects of the pandemic.   As such, we are extremely excited for the 2021 Cruise Europe Conference in Edinburgh, UK, which will be our next opportunity to interact with our members. Themes at the event will likely include new protocols to safely operate in a post-Covid-19 world and sustainability. Of course, the resumption of cruising will also be a major topic at the event. We are in discussions with our host port regarding a suitable date and format which will be decided when national restrictions become clearer in the new year. 

Read more

 

Victory getting northern exposure with Alaska sailings

American Queen Steamboat Co. (AQSC), best known for its traditional paddle-wheelers that ply the Mississippi, will make its debut in Alaska this year with the launch of sister company Victory Cruises' first expedition ship, the Ocean Victory. The 93-suite newbuild is the first of two planned by AQSC's Victory Cruises, and the cruise will mark the first expansion for American Queen and Victory beyond the lower 48 states.  AQSC founder and CEO John Waggoner said in a recent interview that the company, which purchased Victory Cruises in 2018, was targeting May 22 for the inaugural sailing of the Ocean Victory. (The company has since pushed that back to June.)  After spending the summer in Alaska, the 200-passenger ship is scheduled to make a 12-day cruise from Vancouver to Seattle at the end of September, followed by a 17-day cruise from San Diego through Mexico's Sea of Cortes and on to Costa Rica.

Read more

  

Baltic Ports Ready for 2021 Cruise Season, Ask Authorities to Cooperate

Representatives of 13 Baltic ports have met to exchange experience and prepare for the resumption of cruising in 2021. This was announced by the Baltic Ports Organization in a press release.  The ports represented at the meeting were Copenhagen Malmö Port, Gdynia, Gothenburg, HaminaKotka, Helsinki, Kiel, Klaipeda, Roenne, Rostock, Riga, Stockholm, St. Petersburg, and Tallinn.  Ensuring the health of the passengers and crews and the implementation of all the necessary safety rules were the key items on the meeting agenda.  Some other points made were preparations to handle passengers with restrictions in force, safety rules and protocols for port personnel – including virus testing procedures for passengers, temperature scanning and logistic solutions, cooperation with cruise lines to make implementation easier and approving plans with the responsible authorities.  According to cruise managers, the aforementioned approval process remains rather slow, the organization wrote.  “Baltic ports urge the national authorities to actively cooperate with the industry in order to speed up the process as the cruise season is fast approaching,” Baltic Ports Organization wrote. 

Read more


Another Pause in Australia Operations for Carnival Cruise Line

Carnival Cruise Line has extended its pause in operations in Australia.  "As the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve, we are sorry to share the news that Carnival Cruise Line is pausing operations for all Australian sailings departing through May 19 2021, as well all Carnival Spirit sailings through to and including 12 June 2021," the company said, in a statement. 

Read more….

 

Accommodation Vessels Set to Play Key Drydock Role

“Chartering one of our floating hotel vessels provides so many benefits,” said Kendra L. Holmes, director of business development and commercial operations at Miray International.  “Cruise lines are able to shorten their refurbishment times by having everyone off their vessel and completing all the projects at one time," said, in the 2021 Drydock Report by Cruise Industry News.  "There is no need to move vendors from room to room or provide hot water, air-conditioning, or food services. When no one is living onboard, all of these services can be taken down and worked on at one time.”  Miray’s 2020 was squashed by coronavirus, as a large project in Cadiz didn’t happen, and two other big refurbishments that called for accommodation vessels were shelved, for now.  Bringing in an accommodation vessel means less transport time for workers, Holmes said, noting that they provide food, entertainment, housekeeping, laundry and other services. 

Read more

 

Immigration New Zealand Throws Wrench into Ponant's February Cruises

Immigration New Zealand has denied entry for some crew who they have deemed to be non-essential aboard Ponant's Le Laperouse, which was set to offer a New Zealand program in February.  The New Zealand Cruise Association (NZCA) meanwhile said in a statement it believes that all the ship’s crew are essential to its operation and they cannot be replaced by New Zealanders in such a short time. "It is a case of one Ministry giving and another taking away. Government departments must begin to talk to each other, not take separate action which once again greatly harms the tourism industry," said NZCA Chief Executive Officer Kevin O’Sullivan.  "The Minister of Immigration has tried to paint the decision as the fault of Ponant for not following procedure, but it is not so. As soon as the exemption was granted Ponant provided information to Immigration NZ on visa requirements for the ship’s crew, giving ample time for a response and following up with an application when they had assembled the information requested more than three weeks ago," O’Sullivan continued. "They did everything that was requested by the New Zealand Government in order to offer safe domestic cruising in New Zealand." 

Read more

 

A Caribbean paradise with a lot to offer

Guadeloupe is an archipelago of more than 12 islands situated in the southern Caribbean, near to Antigua and Barbuda. The archipelago’s five main islands can accommodate all kinds of ships, offering visitors the chance to enjoy stunning beaches, spectacular waterfalls, and the opportunity to hike mountains and a volcano. The beauty of the islands is the unique selling point for the tourist board. “Guadeloupe’s waterfalls and the amazing fauna and flora will captivate cruise guests,” says Olivier-Bernard Michel, director of development at Guadeloupe’s Tourist Office, who is also head of market development, welcoming, cruise and nautical activities. Hikers will also find that they are very much catered for. “The volcano, La Grande Soufrière, is 120,000 years old and reaches an altitude of 1,467 metres,” says Michel. “A footpath allows the most adventurous and nature-loving visitors to ascend the volcano. They can easily explore the three waterfalls that tumble down the side of the Soufrière.” 

Read more

 

Coral Expeditions Marks Tasmanian Restart to Summer Expedition Season

Coral Expeditions has completed the first Australian cruise for 2021 with what it said was successful restart voyage circumnavigating the pristine coastal waters of Tasmania.  The voyage was sold out a year in advance, although several guests were not able to travel due to border restrictions at the time of departure on New Year’s Day. An intimate group of 45 guests enjoyed perfect weather and wide-open spaces over the 16-night adventure, the company said.  The Circumnavigation of Tasmania kickstarted Coral Expeditions annual summer season cruising Tasmania’s remote coastal islands and National Parks. As with the successful Great Barrier Reef series in October last year, the proven and tested SailSAFE medical protocols were strictly applied, with guests and crew undertaking pre-cruise health screening, a COVID-19 PCR test, and completing Tasmania’s mandatory e-pass prior to entering the state. Guests were then able to relax onboard a breath in the clean air and striking natural beauty of the region.

Read more

 

Royal Caribbean chooses Barbados as new homeport

Royal Caribbean International is launching three new itineraries from Barbados from December 2021, with seven- and 14-night sailings onboard Grandeur of the Seas visiting destinations across the southern Caribbean.  “We are excited to grow our long-standing partnership with Barbados and introduce Bridgetown as Royal Caribbean's newest homeport,” said Michael Bayley, president and CEO of Royal Caribbean International. “The pink-sand beaches and unexpected adventures across Barbados also make it an ideal destination for our guests to experience even more of the Caribbean charm and culture before or after their cruise.”  The seven-night voyages will visit a different destination every day, with late-night stays in the islands of Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao. The longer 14-night sailings will include an overnight stay in Aruba, along with visits to Cartagena, Colombia, Colon, Panama, Puerto Limon and Costa Rica, among others. All three itineraries will include visits to three new ports of call for Royal Caribbean: the islands of Trinidad, Tobago and St. Vincent. 

Read more….

 

Rostock-Warnemünde Confident for Q2 Restart of Cruising

Rostock is confident that it’ll be able to restart cruising operations in the second quarter of 2021. The port announced this in a press release for 2020 results. “We are confident that cruise tourism in Warnemünde and the Baltic Sea will start again in the second quarter of this year. The precondition for this is an easing of the intensity of the pandemic in Germany and Europe and the consequent lifting of national and international travel restrictions,” said the Managing Director of Rostock Port, Jens A. Scharner.  He added that implementing “comprehensive hygiene and safety concepts” for passengers and ships’ crews onboard and in the cruise ports will play a “decisive role in the successful restart of cruise shipping.” Despite planning for the calls of 207 cruise ships with more than 600,000 passengers, Warnemünde cruise port only saw one port call in 2020, which was carried out by a passenger vessel with 200 travelers. However, there was some positive news for the cruise port in 2020 as its responsible authority, the planning department of the Hanseatic and University City of Rostock, conducted the construction of a shore power installation to supply ships at berths P7 and P8. 

Read more….

 

Video: Why Ships Use Port and Starboard Instead of Left and Right?

Ever wondered why the terms “Port” and “Starboard” is used to denote Left and Right side on ships? Well, we wondered and went on to find the answer for you. Read on to know the interesting story behind it: During earlier days, before ships had rudders on their centerlines, boats were controlled using a steering oar. A steering oar was basically just a modified ore generally attached in a vertical direction to one side of the ship/boat. As it is very common that most of the people are right-handed in the world, most of the sailors were also right-handed, so the steering oar used to control the ship was placed over or through the right side near the stern. Thus, most of the sailors used to call the right side as the “Steering Side”, which soon became “Starboard”. The word “Starboard” is formed by combining two old English words: stéor (meaning “steer”) and bord (meaning “the side of a boat”). 

Watch the video….

 

Cruise lines must ‘tell their story’ to reassure public and politicians

The cruise sector has been urged to get across its messages about Covid-19 safety measures and the “world-class” experiences onboard in order to resume sailing effectively. Kelly Craighead, the president and chief executive of Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) encouraged the sector to shout about how it has managed the pandemic and the new protocols it has put in place. She told a Travel Weekly webcast: “Cruising is a critically important part of many countries’ economies and so we need to continue to tell our story about the measures that we have taken and to be able to really demonstrate that we are an extraordinary part of this experience. 

Read more and watch the video


 

Picture: CDC Emergency Ops. Center on Unsplash


SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago… 

Diamond Princess, Quarantine ended, 620 totals ill, 2 passengers die

See Japan Today and USA Today for details. Market Watch reports there are now 53 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. as more people who returned from the Diamond Princess cruise ship tested positive for the virus, according to a new update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's a total of 39 U.S. nationals who had been on the Diamond Princess who have been infected by the virus. At least 695 people who were on the ship were confirmed ill; three people have died. Of those confirmed ill, 70 were Filipino crew members.  

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

231

|

Volume

15

February 19, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Developing the new protocols for a ‘new normal’
  • Victory getting northern exposure with Alaska sailings
  • Baltic Ports Ready for 2021 Cruise Season, Ask Authorities to Cooperate
  • Another Pause in Australia Operations for Carnival Cruise Line
  • Accommodation Vessels Set to Play Key Drydock Role
  • Immigration New Zealand Throws Wrench into Ponant's February Cruises
  • A Caribbean paradise with a lot to offer
  • Coral Expeditions Marks Tasmanian Restart to Summer Expedition Season
  • Royal Caribbean chooses Barbados as new homeport
  • Rostock-Warnemünde Confident for Q2 Restart of Cruising
  • Why Ships Use Port and Starboard Instead of Left and Right? (Video)
  • Cruise lines must ‘tell their story’ to reassure public and politicians
  • SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

Cover Image by:

Think rocket ship. Photo by Bill Jelen on Unsplash

Developing the new protocols for a ‘new normal’

Europe’s diversity and year-round opportunities, coupled with pioneering cruise lines, could speed up the return to normality of the continent’s cruise industry.  Europe is a diverse continent that has much to offer – its location and mild seasonal changes make it accessible year-round and enable our ports to offer a variety of opportunities to visitors. Our members are divided into four regions which all have their unique selling points: Atlantic Europe; the Baltic; UK and Ireland; and Norway, Iceland and the Faroe Islands.  With the current challenges created by Covid-19, we are working to support ports, cruise lines and the broader industry in getting back to a ‘new normal’ where these opportunities are, once again, available to cruise guests. We aim to bring the positive and encouraging news of start-ups to our members and the industry in a time when we are all feeling the effects of the pandemic.   As such, we are extremely excited for the 2021 Cruise Europe Conference in Edinburgh, UK, which will be our next opportunity to interact with our members. Themes at the event will likely include new protocols to safely operate in a post-Covid-19 world and sustainability. Of course, the resumption of cruising will also be a major topic at the event. We are in discussions with our host port regarding a suitable date and format which will be decided when national restrictions become clearer in the new year. 

Read more

 

Victory getting northern exposure with Alaska sailings

American Queen Steamboat Co. (AQSC), best known for its traditional paddle-wheelers that ply the Mississippi, will make its debut in Alaska this year with the launch of sister company Victory Cruises' first expedition ship, the Ocean Victory. The 93-suite newbuild is the first of two planned by AQSC's Victory Cruises, and the cruise will mark the first expansion for American Queen and Victory beyond the lower 48 states.  AQSC founder and CEO John Waggoner said in a recent interview that the company, which purchased Victory Cruises in 2018, was targeting May 22 for the inaugural sailing of the Ocean Victory. (The company has since pushed that back to June.)  After spending the summer in Alaska, the 200-passenger ship is scheduled to make a 12-day cruise from Vancouver to Seattle at the end of September, followed by a 17-day cruise from San Diego through Mexico's Sea of Cortes and on to Costa Rica.

Read more

  

Baltic Ports Ready for 2021 Cruise Season, Ask Authorities to Cooperate

Representatives of 13 Baltic ports have met to exchange experience and prepare for the resumption of cruising in 2021. This was announced by the Baltic Ports Organization in a press release.  The ports represented at the meeting were Copenhagen Malmö Port, Gdynia, Gothenburg, HaminaKotka, Helsinki, Kiel, Klaipeda, Roenne, Rostock, Riga, Stockholm, St. Petersburg, and Tallinn.  Ensuring the health of the passengers and crews and the implementation of all the necessary safety rules were the key items on the meeting agenda.  Some other points made were preparations to handle passengers with restrictions in force, safety rules and protocols for port personnel – including virus testing procedures for passengers, temperature scanning and logistic solutions, cooperation with cruise lines to make implementation easier and approving plans with the responsible authorities.  According to cruise managers, the aforementioned approval process remains rather slow, the organization wrote.  “Baltic ports urge the national authorities to actively cooperate with the industry in order to speed up the process as the cruise season is fast approaching,” Baltic Ports Organization wrote. 

Read more


Another Pause in Australia Operations for Carnival Cruise Line

Carnival Cruise Line has extended its pause in operations in Australia.  "As the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve, we are sorry to share the news that Carnival Cruise Line is pausing operations for all Australian sailings departing through May 19 2021, as well all Carnival Spirit sailings through to and including 12 June 2021," the company said, in a statement. 

Read more….

 

Accommodation Vessels Set to Play Key Drydock Role

“Chartering one of our floating hotel vessels provides so many benefits,” said Kendra L. Holmes, director of business development and commercial operations at Miray International.  “Cruise lines are able to shorten their refurbishment times by having everyone off their vessel and completing all the projects at one time," said, in the 2021 Drydock Report by Cruise Industry News.  "There is no need to move vendors from room to room or provide hot water, air-conditioning, or food services. When no one is living onboard, all of these services can be taken down and worked on at one time.”  Miray’s 2020 was squashed by coronavirus, as a large project in Cadiz didn’t happen, and two other big refurbishments that called for accommodation vessels were shelved, for now.  Bringing in an accommodation vessel means less transport time for workers, Holmes said, noting that they provide food, entertainment, housekeeping, laundry and other services. 

Read more

 

Immigration New Zealand Throws Wrench into Ponant's February Cruises

Immigration New Zealand has denied entry for some crew who they have deemed to be non-essential aboard Ponant's Le Laperouse, which was set to offer a New Zealand program in February.  The New Zealand Cruise Association (NZCA) meanwhile said in a statement it believes that all the ship’s crew are essential to its operation and they cannot be replaced by New Zealanders in such a short time. "It is a case of one Ministry giving and another taking away. Government departments must begin to talk to each other, not take separate action which once again greatly harms the tourism industry," said NZCA Chief Executive Officer Kevin O’Sullivan.  "The Minister of Immigration has tried to paint the decision as the fault of Ponant for not following procedure, but it is not so. As soon as the exemption was granted Ponant provided information to Immigration NZ on visa requirements for the ship’s crew, giving ample time for a response and following up with an application when they had assembled the information requested more than three weeks ago," O’Sullivan continued. "They did everything that was requested by the New Zealand Government in order to offer safe domestic cruising in New Zealand." 

Read more

 

A Caribbean paradise with a lot to offer

Guadeloupe is an archipelago of more than 12 islands situated in the southern Caribbean, near to Antigua and Barbuda. The archipelago’s five main islands can accommodate all kinds of ships, offering visitors the chance to enjoy stunning beaches, spectacular waterfalls, and the opportunity to hike mountains and a volcano. The beauty of the islands is the unique selling point for the tourist board. “Guadeloupe’s waterfalls and the amazing fauna and flora will captivate cruise guests,” says Olivier-Bernard Michel, director of development at Guadeloupe’s Tourist Office, who is also head of market development, welcoming, cruise and nautical activities. Hikers will also find that they are very much catered for. “The volcano, La Grande Soufrière, is 120,000 years old and reaches an altitude of 1,467 metres,” says Michel. “A footpath allows the most adventurous and nature-loving visitors to ascend the volcano. They can easily explore the three waterfalls that tumble down the side of the Soufrière.” 

Read more

 

Coral Expeditions Marks Tasmanian Restart to Summer Expedition Season

Coral Expeditions has completed the first Australian cruise for 2021 with what it said was successful restart voyage circumnavigating the pristine coastal waters of Tasmania.  The voyage was sold out a year in advance, although several guests were not able to travel due to border restrictions at the time of departure on New Year’s Day. An intimate group of 45 guests enjoyed perfect weather and wide-open spaces over the 16-night adventure, the company said.  The Circumnavigation of Tasmania kickstarted Coral Expeditions annual summer season cruising Tasmania’s remote coastal islands and National Parks. As with the successful Great Barrier Reef series in October last year, the proven and tested SailSAFE medical protocols were strictly applied, with guests and crew undertaking pre-cruise health screening, a COVID-19 PCR test, and completing Tasmania’s mandatory e-pass prior to entering the state. Guests were then able to relax onboard a breath in the clean air and striking natural beauty of the region.

Read more

 

Royal Caribbean chooses Barbados as new homeport

Royal Caribbean International is launching three new itineraries from Barbados from December 2021, with seven- and 14-night sailings onboard Grandeur of the Seas visiting destinations across the southern Caribbean.  “We are excited to grow our long-standing partnership with Barbados and introduce Bridgetown as Royal Caribbean's newest homeport,” said Michael Bayley, president and CEO of Royal Caribbean International. “The pink-sand beaches and unexpected adventures across Barbados also make it an ideal destination for our guests to experience even more of the Caribbean charm and culture before or after their cruise.”  The seven-night voyages will visit a different destination every day, with late-night stays in the islands of Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao. The longer 14-night sailings will include an overnight stay in Aruba, along with visits to Cartagena, Colombia, Colon, Panama, Puerto Limon and Costa Rica, among others. All three itineraries will include visits to three new ports of call for Royal Caribbean: the islands of Trinidad, Tobago and St. Vincent. 

Read more….

 

Rostock-Warnemünde Confident for Q2 Restart of Cruising

Rostock is confident that it’ll be able to restart cruising operations in the second quarter of 2021. The port announced this in a press release for 2020 results. “We are confident that cruise tourism in Warnemünde and the Baltic Sea will start again in the second quarter of this year. The precondition for this is an easing of the intensity of the pandemic in Germany and Europe and the consequent lifting of national and international travel restrictions,” said the Managing Director of Rostock Port, Jens A. Scharner.  He added that implementing “comprehensive hygiene and safety concepts” for passengers and ships’ crews onboard and in the cruise ports will play a “decisive role in the successful restart of cruise shipping.” Despite planning for the calls of 207 cruise ships with more than 600,000 passengers, Warnemünde cruise port only saw one port call in 2020, which was carried out by a passenger vessel with 200 travelers. However, there was some positive news for the cruise port in 2020 as its responsible authority, the planning department of the Hanseatic and University City of Rostock, conducted the construction of a shore power installation to supply ships at berths P7 and P8. 

Read more….

 

Video: Why Ships Use Port and Starboard Instead of Left and Right?

Ever wondered why the terms “Port” and “Starboard” is used to denote Left and Right side on ships? Well, we wondered and went on to find the answer for you. Read on to know the interesting story behind it: During earlier days, before ships had rudders on their centerlines, boats were controlled using a steering oar. A steering oar was basically just a modified ore generally attached in a vertical direction to one side of the ship/boat. As it is very common that most of the people are right-handed in the world, most of the sailors were also right-handed, so the steering oar used to control the ship was placed over or through the right side near the stern. Thus, most of the sailors used to call the right side as the “Steering Side”, which soon became “Starboard”. The word “Starboard” is formed by combining two old English words: stéor (meaning “steer”) and bord (meaning “the side of a boat”). 

Watch the video….

 

Cruise lines must ‘tell their story’ to reassure public and politicians

The cruise sector has been urged to get across its messages about Covid-19 safety measures and the “world-class” experiences onboard in order to resume sailing effectively. Kelly Craighead, the president and chief executive of Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) encouraged the sector to shout about how it has managed the pandemic and the new protocols it has put in place. She told a Travel Weekly webcast: “Cruising is a critically important part of many countries’ economies and so we need to continue to tell our story about the measures that we have taken and to be able to really demonstrate that we are an extraordinary part of this experience. 

Read more and watch the video


 

Picture: CDC Emergency Ops. Center on Unsplash


SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago… 

Diamond Princess, Quarantine ended, 620 totals ill, 2 passengers die

See Japan Today and USA Today for details. Market Watch reports there are now 53 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. as more people who returned from the Diamond Princess cruise ship tested positive for the virus, according to a new update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's a total of 39 U.S. nationals who had been on the Diamond Princess who have been infected by the virus. At least 695 people who were on the ship were confirmed ill; three people have died. Of those confirmed ill, 70 were Filipino crew members.  

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

February 19, 2021

Developing the new protocols for a ‘new normal’

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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