Issue #

233

|

Volume

15

February 24, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • From Masks to Testing, Carnival Officially Details New Cruise Rules
  • When will it be safe to cruise again? These signs that will help you decide when to sail
  • Cruise Fanatics Eagerly Volunteer to Test Virus Protocols Aboard Ships
  • Canada's New Cruise Ship Ban Spoils the 2021 Alaska and New England Seasons, Too
  • When will cruise lines welcome passengers to the next sea escape?
  • MSC Cancels More U.S. Cruises in 2021
  • Canada extends cruise ship ban -- and Alaska is affected, too
  • U.S. Flagged Cruise Lines Will Still Sail Alaska in 2021
  • Maritime businesses brace for a second summer without cruise ship tourists
  • Timeline on North America's cruise restart keeps extending, Alaska in doubt
  • Seabourn's 2022 voyages in Europe, Alaska-BC, Canada-New England
  • SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

Cover Image by:

Photo on www.charite.de by  Müller/Charité

From Masks to Testing, Carnival Officially Details New Cruise Rules

There’s a clearer picture of what a Carnival cruise will look like post-shutdown, as the company has issued details on new protocols designed to minimize the risk of viral transmission aboard its ships. A Carnival spokesperson tells Cruise Radio that the new policies are part of an industry-wide disclosure process required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Conditional Sailing Order.  Click on the following link to read the latest updates from Carnival…. Itinerary Changes, Travel Alerts and Advisories | Carnival Cruise Line   Carnival says the new policies and procedures — which will be mandatory for all guests — were developed based on guidance and directives from health authorities including the CDC, governments in the U.S. and abroad, and additional advice from medical and public health experts. The cruise line stipulates that “all guests must read and comply with these Policies and Procedures at all times.” It also points out that the rules “are subject to change without notice due to evolving recommendations, requirements, and situational need with regard to COVID-19.” 

Read more…..

 

When will it be safe to cruise again? These signs that will help you decide when to sail

Travel industry watchers say most people won't feel completely safe on a cruise ship until fall. What has to happen first? It's been a hard year for cruise passengers. Last March, the cruise industry all but shut down and remained beached for the rest of 2020. Now, passengers are eager to know when it will be safe to cruise again.  In November, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control issued a Framework for Conditional Sailing Order, which defined the requirements for resuming operations in U.S. ports. Most major cruise lines won't start their schedules until late spring.  But when will it be safe for you to cruise? That's a difficult question to answer, and it depends on your health and how much of a risk you're willing to take, according to experts. 

Read more

 

Cruise Fanatics Eagerly Volunteer to Test Virus Protocols Aboard Ships

More than 250,000 have signed up for a Royal Caribbean program that might still be months away.  When Royal Caribbean International announced it was looking for volunteers to help test its post-pandemic health and safety protocols, Melody Wiggins was among the first to sign up.  “No matter where [they] want me to be, I’m there,” says Wiggins, 58, a life coach from Southern California who calls the 4,180-passenger Anthem of the Seas her “home away from home.” After she fell in love with cruising in 2018, she’s been on 16 voyages—several of them on the Anthem. Her obsession is a straightforward romance with ocean views, sunrises at sea, and the smell of salt breezes. “I miss all of that,” she says. 

Read more….

 

Canada's New Cruise Ship Ban Spoils the 2021 Alaska and New England Seasons, Too

Canada has banned cruise ships in its waters until February 2022, which may also sink the American cruise season in Alaska.  On Thursday, the government of Canada announced a ban on sailing in Canadian waters that stretches for another year—through February 22, 2022.  The rule, which forbids ships carrying more than 100 passengers from visiting Canadian ports, has far-reaching consequences that will even stop all cruises from the continental United States to Alaska. The problem arises from U.S. laws called the Jones Act and the Passenger Vessel Services Act (PVSA), which require all foreign-flagged ships (as most cruise ships are) to stop in at least one foreign port on each voyage that also uses American waters.

Read more

 

When will cruise lines welcome passengers to the next sea escape?

In a recent announcement, Disney Cruise Line said that it would postpone sailings until April or May. While the Disney announcement was met with both anticipation and concern, a bigger question remains unanswered: Will cruise lines be stuck in port through the summer 2021? Popular travel writer The Points Guy has a complete list of cruise lines and their potential next embarking dates. Basically, the majority of well-known companies have an anticipated return of late spring, early summer of … 

Read more….

 

MSC Cancels More U.S. Cruises in 2021

MSC Cruises has announced a further extension of the temporary pause on its United States-based sailings through April 30, 2021. The decision will affect the schedules of three vessels that are based in Florida: MSC Divina scheduled to sail from Port Canaveral, MSC Meraviglia scheduled to sail from PortMiami, and MSC Armonia also scheduled to sail from PortMiami. MSC Divina docked at the line’s...

Read more… 

 

Photo by Matt Brett on Unsplash

Canada extends cruise ship ban -- and Alaska is affected, too

Because of the worsening Covid-19 pandemic, Canada has extended its cruise ship ban until February 2022. And that also affects Alaska and even Seattle.  People who have been hoping to cruise the northern waters of North America this summer will have to place their travel dreams in dry dock for now.  Because of the worsening Covid-19 pandemic, Canada has extended its cruise ship ban until February 2022. That affects popular voyages in Canada, including the St. Lawrence River and Maritime Provinces on the Atlantic side to British Columbia along the Pacific Coast.  But the ban extension is also going to hit Alaska and even Seattle, Washington, hard through a combination of geographical proximity and US maritime rules. 

Read more

 

U.S. Flagged Cruise Lines Will Still Sail Alaska in 2021

Small boat adventure line UnCruise Adventures will still be sailing in Alaska as scheduled for the 2021 season. Despite Canada’s extended cruise ship ban that is set to last until 2022, the U.S. flagged and Alaska-owned small boat operator does not fall under the ban, operating vessels with less than 100 passengers and crew...

Read more

 

Maritime businesses brace for a second summer without cruise ship tourists

According to the Port of Halifax and Port Saint John, cruise ship traffic is worth about $166 million a year to Nova Scotia and about $50 million to New Brunswick.  It’s going to be another tough summer for waterfront businesses in the Maritimes as they make do without cruise ship tourists for the second year in a row. The federal government announced on Thursday that it would extend a ban on cruise ships entering Canadian waters until 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  “Last summer was without a doubt the strangest summer of our lives in the industry,” says Dennis Campbell, CEO of Ambassatours Gray Line.

The tourism company owns and operates several gift shops, restaurants and excursions in the Halifax area. 

Read more

 

Timeline on North America's cruise restart keeps extending, Alaska in doubt

Most major North American lines have already canceled sailings through April and a few into May but some sources think it's going to take months longer. Plus, doubts are growing about an Alaska season because Canada may not want cruise ships and small Alaskan communities may not have the will or means to handle thousands of visitors under complicated protocols.  It took the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seven months to replace the no-sail order with a framework for conditional sailing, and three months later the agency has yet to issue technical guidelines beyond those for mitigating COVID-19 among crew and providing for their regular testing. This is what the 'green' status relates to — it means no cases of COVID-19 or COVID-like illness for 28 days and allows crew from those ships to disembark and use commercial transport. 

Read more…. 

 

Seabourn's 2022 voyages in Europe, Alaska-BC, Canada-New England

The ultra-premium cruise brand Seabourn opened for booking summer and fall 2022 voyages on February 5. The itinerary program includes Europe, Alaska-British Columbia, Canada-New England.  A range of itineraries are offered in each region, including 68 in Europe (summer 2022) with lengths of 7 to 14 days and B2B options to combine itineraries to up to 38 days. 

The ships Encore, Ovation, Quest and Sojourn are scheduled to sail in Europe with itineraries visiting a combination of popular port cities and hidden gems as well as destinations accessible only to superyachts and smaller-sized ships. The program includes 27 European ports that Seabourn has not visited in the past 5 years, or ever before. Maiden port calls are scheduled for Vis (Croatia), Trogir (Croatia), Esbjerg (Denmark), Plymouth UK, Portsmouth UK, La Ciotat (Bouches-du-Rhone France), Douarnenez (Brittany France), Laerdal (Norway), Ferrol (Galicia Spain), Puerto del Rosario (Fuerteventura, Canaries).  In addition, the company has scheduled for 2022 a total of 15 Alaska and British Columbia cruises with Seabourn Odyssey, ranging 7 to 11 days and up to 2 weeks as B2Bs. Seabourn also offers 6 Canada and New England cruises in late summer-early fall (with Seabourn Quest), ranging 12-14 days.

Read more

 

Photo by Fernando Jorge on Unsplash

SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

 

Cruise Lines 2019 Q4 Breakdown: By the Numbers

Cruise Industry News takes a look at the financial performance of the “big three” following the final quarter of 2019.  While gross revenue was up for Q4 2019 for the three publicly-traded cruise companies, increased operating expenses led to reduced operating income, net income and net income per passenger day, compared to Q4 for the previous year.  Net revenue per passenger day was also down year-over-year for Carnival Corporation, up noticeably for Royal Caribbean and up slightly for Norwegian.  Gross revenue per passenger day was significantly up for all three companies, including onboard spending, with gross ticket revenue per day also up for Royal Caribbean and Norwegian, but down for Carnival.

Read more…

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

233

|

Volume

15

February 24, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • From Masks to Testing, Carnival Officially Details New Cruise Rules
  • When will it be safe to cruise again? These signs that will help you decide when to sail
  • Cruise Fanatics Eagerly Volunteer to Test Virus Protocols Aboard Ships
  • Canada's New Cruise Ship Ban Spoils the 2021 Alaska and New England Seasons, Too
  • When will cruise lines welcome passengers to the next sea escape?
  • MSC Cancels More U.S. Cruises in 2021
  • Canada extends cruise ship ban -- and Alaska is affected, too
  • U.S. Flagged Cruise Lines Will Still Sail Alaska in 2021
  • Maritime businesses brace for a second summer without cruise ship tourists
  • Timeline on North America's cruise restart keeps extending, Alaska in doubt
  • Seabourn's 2022 voyages in Europe, Alaska-BC, Canada-New England
  • SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

Cover Image by:

Photo on www.charite.de by  Müller/Charité

From Masks to Testing, Carnival Officially Details New Cruise Rules

There’s a clearer picture of what a Carnival cruise will look like post-shutdown, as the company has issued details on new protocols designed to minimize the risk of viral transmission aboard its ships. A Carnival spokesperson tells Cruise Radio that the new policies are part of an industry-wide disclosure process required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Conditional Sailing Order.  Click on the following link to read the latest updates from Carnival…. Itinerary Changes, Travel Alerts and Advisories | Carnival Cruise Line   Carnival says the new policies and procedures — which will be mandatory for all guests — were developed based on guidance and directives from health authorities including the CDC, governments in the U.S. and abroad, and additional advice from medical and public health experts. The cruise line stipulates that “all guests must read and comply with these Policies and Procedures at all times.” It also points out that the rules “are subject to change without notice due to evolving recommendations, requirements, and situational need with regard to COVID-19.” 

Read more…..

 

When will it be safe to cruise again? These signs that will help you decide when to sail

Travel industry watchers say most people won't feel completely safe on a cruise ship until fall. What has to happen first? It's been a hard year for cruise passengers. Last March, the cruise industry all but shut down and remained beached for the rest of 2020. Now, passengers are eager to know when it will be safe to cruise again.  In November, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control issued a Framework for Conditional Sailing Order, which defined the requirements for resuming operations in U.S. ports. Most major cruise lines won't start their schedules until late spring.  But when will it be safe for you to cruise? That's a difficult question to answer, and it depends on your health and how much of a risk you're willing to take, according to experts. 

Read more

 

Cruise Fanatics Eagerly Volunteer to Test Virus Protocols Aboard Ships

More than 250,000 have signed up for a Royal Caribbean program that might still be months away.  When Royal Caribbean International announced it was looking for volunteers to help test its post-pandemic health and safety protocols, Melody Wiggins was among the first to sign up.  “No matter where [they] want me to be, I’m there,” says Wiggins, 58, a life coach from Southern California who calls the 4,180-passenger Anthem of the Seas her “home away from home.” After she fell in love with cruising in 2018, she’s been on 16 voyages—several of them on the Anthem. Her obsession is a straightforward romance with ocean views, sunrises at sea, and the smell of salt breezes. “I miss all of that,” she says. 

Read more….

 

Canada's New Cruise Ship Ban Spoils the 2021 Alaska and New England Seasons, Too

Canada has banned cruise ships in its waters until February 2022, which may also sink the American cruise season in Alaska.  On Thursday, the government of Canada announced a ban on sailing in Canadian waters that stretches for another year—through February 22, 2022.  The rule, which forbids ships carrying more than 100 passengers from visiting Canadian ports, has far-reaching consequences that will even stop all cruises from the continental United States to Alaska. The problem arises from U.S. laws called the Jones Act and the Passenger Vessel Services Act (PVSA), which require all foreign-flagged ships (as most cruise ships are) to stop in at least one foreign port on each voyage that also uses American waters.

Read more

 

When will cruise lines welcome passengers to the next sea escape?

In a recent announcement, Disney Cruise Line said that it would postpone sailings until April or May. While the Disney announcement was met with both anticipation and concern, a bigger question remains unanswered: Will cruise lines be stuck in port through the summer 2021? Popular travel writer The Points Guy has a complete list of cruise lines and their potential next embarking dates. Basically, the majority of well-known companies have an anticipated return of late spring, early summer of … 

Read more….

 

MSC Cancels More U.S. Cruises in 2021

MSC Cruises has announced a further extension of the temporary pause on its United States-based sailings through April 30, 2021. The decision will affect the schedules of three vessels that are based in Florida: MSC Divina scheduled to sail from Port Canaveral, MSC Meraviglia scheduled to sail from PortMiami, and MSC Armonia also scheduled to sail from PortMiami. MSC Divina docked at the line’s...

Read more… 

 

Photo by Matt Brett on Unsplash

Canada extends cruise ship ban -- and Alaska is affected, too

Because of the worsening Covid-19 pandemic, Canada has extended its cruise ship ban until February 2022. And that also affects Alaska and even Seattle.  People who have been hoping to cruise the northern waters of North America this summer will have to place their travel dreams in dry dock for now.  Because of the worsening Covid-19 pandemic, Canada has extended its cruise ship ban until February 2022. That affects popular voyages in Canada, including the St. Lawrence River and Maritime Provinces on the Atlantic side to British Columbia along the Pacific Coast.  But the ban extension is also going to hit Alaska and even Seattle, Washington, hard through a combination of geographical proximity and US maritime rules. 

Read more

 

U.S. Flagged Cruise Lines Will Still Sail Alaska in 2021

Small boat adventure line UnCruise Adventures will still be sailing in Alaska as scheduled for the 2021 season. Despite Canada’s extended cruise ship ban that is set to last until 2022, the U.S. flagged and Alaska-owned small boat operator does not fall under the ban, operating vessels with less than 100 passengers and crew...

Read more

 

Maritime businesses brace for a second summer without cruise ship tourists

According to the Port of Halifax and Port Saint John, cruise ship traffic is worth about $166 million a year to Nova Scotia and about $50 million to New Brunswick.  It’s going to be another tough summer for waterfront businesses in the Maritimes as they make do without cruise ship tourists for the second year in a row. The federal government announced on Thursday that it would extend a ban on cruise ships entering Canadian waters until 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  “Last summer was without a doubt the strangest summer of our lives in the industry,” says Dennis Campbell, CEO of Ambassatours Gray Line.

The tourism company owns and operates several gift shops, restaurants and excursions in the Halifax area. 

Read more

 

Timeline on North America's cruise restart keeps extending, Alaska in doubt

Most major North American lines have already canceled sailings through April and a few into May but some sources think it's going to take months longer. Plus, doubts are growing about an Alaska season because Canada may not want cruise ships and small Alaskan communities may not have the will or means to handle thousands of visitors under complicated protocols.  It took the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seven months to replace the no-sail order with a framework for conditional sailing, and three months later the agency has yet to issue technical guidelines beyond those for mitigating COVID-19 among crew and providing for their regular testing. This is what the 'green' status relates to — it means no cases of COVID-19 or COVID-like illness for 28 days and allows crew from those ships to disembark and use commercial transport. 

Read more…. 

 

Seabourn's 2022 voyages in Europe, Alaska-BC, Canada-New England

The ultra-premium cruise brand Seabourn opened for booking summer and fall 2022 voyages on February 5. The itinerary program includes Europe, Alaska-British Columbia, Canada-New England.  A range of itineraries are offered in each region, including 68 in Europe (summer 2022) with lengths of 7 to 14 days and B2B options to combine itineraries to up to 38 days. 

The ships Encore, Ovation, Quest and Sojourn are scheduled to sail in Europe with itineraries visiting a combination of popular port cities and hidden gems as well as destinations accessible only to superyachts and smaller-sized ships. The program includes 27 European ports that Seabourn has not visited in the past 5 years, or ever before. Maiden port calls are scheduled for Vis (Croatia), Trogir (Croatia), Esbjerg (Denmark), Plymouth UK, Portsmouth UK, La Ciotat (Bouches-du-Rhone France), Douarnenez (Brittany France), Laerdal (Norway), Ferrol (Galicia Spain), Puerto del Rosario (Fuerteventura, Canaries).  In addition, the company has scheduled for 2022 a total of 15 Alaska and British Columbia cruises with Seabourn Odyssey, ranging 7 to 11 days and up to 2 weeks as B2Bs. Seabourn also offers 6 Canada and New England cruises in late summer-early fall (with Seabourn Quest), ranging 12-14 days.

Read more

 

Photo by Fernando Jorge on Unsplash

SOMETHING FOR LAST…  Memories from one year ago…

 

Cruise Lines 2019 Q4 Breakdown: By the Numbers

Cruise Industry News takes a look at the financial performance of the “big three” following the final quarter of 2019.  While gross revenue was up for Q4 2019 for the three publicly-traded cruise companies, increased operating expenses led to reduced operating income, net income and net income per passenger day, compared to Q4 for the previous year.  Net revenue per passenger day was also down year-over-year for Carnival Corporation, up noticeably for Royal Caribbean and up slightly for Norwegian.  Gross revenue per passenger day was significantly up for all three companies, including onboard spending, with gross ticket revenue per day also up for Royal Caribbean and Norwegian, but down for Carnival.

Read more…

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

February 24, 2021

From Masks to Testing, Carnival Officially Details New Cruise Rules

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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