Issue #

129

|

Volume

8

July 3, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Keel Laid for First New Large Cruise Ship of the COVID-19 Era
  • Cold Lay-Up Presents Challenges for Equipment Onboard
  • I was stranded at sea on a cruise ship. Now I'm owed $37,000
  • Cruise Ships Leave Asia for North America
  • Cruise and coronavirus under the spotlight in new documentary
  • Their cruises were canceled months ago. These customers are still waiting on refunds.
  • Carnival CEO Sees Opportunity for Sailing in Europe This Summer
  • The Fate of the Pullmantur Cruise Ships - Heading Back to Royal Caribbean

Keel Laid for First New Large Cruise Ship of the COVID-19 Era

"In a major sign of confidence in the future of the cruise industry, MSC Cruises celebrated the keel laying for its newest and largest cruise ship, the 205,000 gross ton MSC World Europa. The first block for the massive, LNG-powered cruise ship, which will also be the first built in France, was lowered into place at the Chantiers de l’Atlantique shipyard in Saint-Nazaire. The ship is rumored to be costing as much as $1.2 billion to build and is the first of four sister ships MSC has ordered from the French shipyard. The ceremonies also marked the first start of construction on a large cruise ship since the onset of the global pandemic and suspension of cruise operations. News of the ceremony comes as construction on most new cruise ships has been delayed and cruise lines have been seeking to reschedule or hold off on deliveries and future orders. Meyer Werft recently reported that Carnival Corporation and its P&O Cruises brand are continuing to delay the delivery of the Iona, which was built in Papenburg, Germany, and is now completed. The Iona was recently sent back to Bremerhaven after drydocking and a final inspection in Rotterdam to await an unspecified delivery date." 

Read more...

Cold Lay-Up Presents Challenges for Equipment Onboard

" "Naturally, the equipment onboard was never designed for long, unplanned lay ups like the ones the industry is experiencing today," said Nicolas Lesbats, Vice President Service Division at ALMACO, a major supplier of galley equipment to the cruise industry. "Managing the equipment, meaning performing a proper switch-off and maintenance during layup, but also conducting a thorough recommissioning, saves money and ensures the ship is ready for action when the ship bell starts ringing again," he said. During a cold lay-up, a modern cruise ship could have as little as 40 crew or less aboard, making equipment monitoring and maintenance difficult. Crew remaining may not have the necessary training for the tasks they are now expected to perform. Challenges can include equipment damage, unnecessary energy use and delays once the ship is put back into service." " 

Read more…

 

I was stranded at sea on a cruise ship. Now I'm owed $37,000

"When she arrived back home after weeks stranded at sea on board the Pacific Princess cruise ship, passenger CJ Hayden, a San Francisco-based author and business coach, submitted a refund request right away. By her reckoning, she and partner Dave Herninko were owed around $37,500.  "They weren't going to charge us for the days that we spent floating around the Indian Ocean with nowhere to go," Hayden tells CNN.  The Pacific Princess set sail back in January for a 111-day round-the-world voyage that was curtailed in mid-March when the Covid-19 pandemic shut down the cruise industry.  Denied entry in several ports, the Pacific eventually docked in Perth, Australia on March 21, with most passengers, including Hayden, disembarking on flights that weekend. The ship's operator, Princess Cruises, said there were no known cases of Covid-19 on board. Hayden and fellow Pacific Princess passengers say they were told they could apply for 100% of their refund back in cash, plus a matching amount in credit against future trips -- known as Future Cruise Credit (FCC). Alternatively, they were offered 250% in credit against future trips." 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Leave Asia for North America

"Although in 2014 it seemed as if the Asian market would be the next big thing for the cruise industry, the proverbial tides have turned. With ships originally designed to target that market now being repositioned, it’s beginning to look as if what was to be the industry’s new hot spot has definitely cooled down.  It’s also created opportunities for cruise lovers to experience ships they might otherwise not have been able to travel on for quite some time." 

Read more…

 

Photo by KAL VISUALS on Unsplash

Cruise and coronavirus under the spotlight in new documentary

"The plight of the cruise industry in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic will be examined in a television documentary to be shown this week. The outbreak of coronavirus brought cruising – as well as the wider travel industry – to a dramatic standstill in early 2020. While other areas of tourism slowly return, with an announcement on air bridges this week and domestic travel relaxed further from July 4, cruise remains largely in a state of uncertainty. Only a handful of river cruises have resumed sailing in Europe and just two lines, Hurtigruten and SeaDream Yacht Club, are operating ocean cruises. None of those cruises currently running are for British travellers, and instead are for the nationalities of each home port with no overseas stops. Cruise lines continue to push back their restart date until later in 2020 and, in some cases, into 2021. According to ITV, who are broadcasting the documentary on July 2, the cruise industry "has sky-rocketed to a more than £100 billion business in the last few years with 30 million people taking to the seas in 2019." 

Read more

 

Their cruises were canceled months ago. These customers are still waiting on refunds.

"While many cruise customers are missing out on refunds because of a technicality that says they only get their money back if the cruise line cancels their trip first, those who have been promised refunds have faced extensive waits to receive their money back – well outside the time window in which the cruise lines said their refunds would be processed. Carrollton, Texas, resident Farah Derebery Miller had booked a Feb. 17 sailing on Norwegian Cruise Line out of Singapore that was canceled on Feb. 13. The voyage had already been moved from Hong Kong to Singapore prior due to port closures.  "We switch[ed] all of our travel plans to Singapore and then they cancel[ed] on us," she told USA TODAY. "They wouldn't let any of us cancel leading up to Feb. 13 or said we would lose all our money." " 

Read more

 

Carnival CEO Sees Opportunity for Sailing in Europe This Summer

"The cruise industry has essentially been shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Arnold Donald, Carnival chief executive officer, discusses how he is preparing for the company’s eventual return to sailing. He spoke during the virtual Bloomberg New Economy Conversations series."

Watch the video

 

The Fate of the Pullmantur Cruise Ships - Heading Back to Royal Caribbean

"We now know what will happen to the Pullmantur ships since the cruise line was dissolved, becoming the first victim of the cruise industry pause on operations. It has been revealed that Royal Caribbean Ltd. will welcome back the Pullmantur cruise ships along with all the crew members. According to El Confidencial, the Sovereign, Monarch, and Horizon cruise ships will be incorporated into Royal Caribbean, which is good news for the thousands of crew members who work onboard. The ships were being rented to Pullmantur and they are currently in a cold layup during the global suspension of cruise travel due to the COVID-19 pandemic." 

Read more

Additionally: https://m.facebook.com/notes/travels-with-anthony/monarch-and-sovereign-to-return-to-royal-caribbean/1394104434113883/

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

129

|

Volume

8

July 3, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Keel Laid for First New Large Cruise Ship of the COVID-19 Era
  • Cold Lay-Up Presents Challenges for Equipment Onboard
  • I was stranded at sea on a cruise ship. Now I'm owed $37,000
  • Cruise Ships Leave Asia for North America
  • Cruise and coronavirus under the spotlight in new documentary
  • Their cruises were canceled months ago. These customers are still waiting on refunds.
  • Carnival CEO Sees Opportunity for Sailing in Europe This Summer
  • The Fate of the Pullmantur Cruise Ships - Heading Back to Royal Caribbean

Keel Laid for First New Large Cruise Ship of the COVID-19 Era

"In a major sign of confidence in the future of the cruise industry, MSC Cruises celebrated the keel laying for its newest and largest cruise ship, the 205,000 gross ton MSC World Europa. The first block for the massive, LNG-powered cruise ship, which will also be the first built in France, was lowered into place at the Chantiers de l’Atlantique shipyard in Saint-Nazaire. The ship is rumored to be costing as much as $1.2 billion to build and is the first of four sister ships MSC has ordered from the French shipyard. The ceremonies also marked the first start of construction on a large cruise ship since the onset of the global pandemic and suspension of cruise operations. News of the ceremony comes as construction on most new cruise ships has been delayed and cruise lines have been seeking to reschedule or hold off on deliveries and future orders. Meyer Werft recently reported that Carnival Corporation and its P&O Cruises brand are continuing to delay the delivery of the Iona, which was built in Papenburg, Germany, and is now completed. The Iona was recently sent back to Bremerhaven after drydocking and a final inspection in Rotterdam to await an unspecified delivery date." 

Read more...

Cold Lay-Up Presents Challenges for Equipment Onboard

" "Naturally, the equipment onboard was never designed for long, unplanned lay ups like the ones the industry is experiencing today," said Nicolas Lesbats, Vice President Service Division at ALMACO, a major supplier of galley equipment to the cruise industry. "Managing the equipment, meaning performing a proper switch-off and maintenance during layup, but also conducting a thorough recommissioning, saves money and ensures the ship is ready for action when the ship bell starts ringing again," he said. During a cold lay-up, a modern cruise ship could have as little as 40 crew or less aboard, making equipment monitoring and maintenance difficult. Crew remaining may not have the necessary training for the tasks they are now expected to perform. Challenges can include equipment damage, unnecessary energy use and delays once the ship is put back into service." " 

Read more…

 

I was stranded at sea on a cruise ship. Now I'm owed $37,000

"When she arrived back home after weeks stranded at sea on board the Pacific Princess cruise ship, passenger CJ Hayden, a San Francisco-based author and business coach, submitted a refund request right away. By her reckoning, she and partner Dave Herninko were owed around $37,500.  "They weren't going to charge us for the days that we spent floating around the Indian Ocean with nowhere to go," Hayden tells CNN.  The Pacific Princess set sail back in January for a 111-day round-the-world voyage that was curtailed in mid-March when the Covid-19 pandemic shut down the cruise industry.  Denied entry in several ports, the Pacific eventually docked in Perth, Australia on March 21, with most passengers, including Hayden, disembarking on flights that weekend. The ship's operator, Princess Cruises, said there were no known cases of Covid-19 on board. Hayden and fellow Pacific Princess passengers say they were told they could apply for 100% of their refund back in cash, plus a matching amount in credit against future trips -- known as Future Cruise Credit (FCC). Alternatively, they were offered 250% in credit against future trips." 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Leave Asia for North America

"Although in 2014 it seemed as if the Asian market would be the next big thing for the cruise industry, the proverbial tides have turned. With ships originally designed to target that market now being repositioned, it’s beginning to look as if what was to be the industry’s new hot spot has definitely cooled down.  It’s also created opportunities for cruise lovers to experience ships they might otherwise not have been able to travel on for quite some time." 

Read more…

 

Photo by KAL VISUALS on Unsplash

Cruise and coronavirus under the spotlight in new documentary

"The plight of the cruise industry in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic will be examined in a television documentary to be shown this week. The outbreak of coronavirus brought cruising – as well as the wider travel industry – to a dramatic standstill in early 2020. While other areas of tourism slowly return, with an announcement on air bridges this week and domestic travel relaxed further from July 4, cruise remains largely in a state of uncertainty. Only a handful of river cruises have resumed sailing in Europe and just two lines, Hurtigruten and SeaDream Yacht Club, are operating ocean cruises. None of those cruises currently running are for British travellers, and instead are for the nationalities of each home port with no overseas stops. Cruise lines continue to push back their restart date until later in 2020 and, in some cases, into 2021. According to ITV, who are broadcasting the documentary on July 2, the cruise industry "has sky-rocketed to a more than £100 billion business in the last few years with 30 million people taking to the seas in 2019." 

Read more

 

Their cruises were canceled months ago. These customers are still waiting on refunds.

"While many cruise customers are missing out on refunds because of a technicality that says they only get their money back if the cruise line cancels their trip first, those who have been promised refunds have faced extensive waits to receive their money back – well outside the time window in which the cruise lines said their refunds would be processed. Carrollton, Texas, resident Farah Derebery Miller had booked a Feb. 17 sailing on Norwegian Cruise Line out of Singapore that was canceled on Feb. 13. The voyage had already been moved from Hong Kong to Singapore prior due to port closures.  "We switch[ed] all of our travel plans to Singapore and then they cancel[ed] on us," she told USA TODAY. "They wouldn't let any of us cancel leading up to Feb. 13 or said we would lose all our money." " 

Read more

 

Carnival CEO Sees Opportunity for Sailing in Europe This Summer

"The cruise industry has essentially been shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Arnold Donald, Carnival chief executive officer, discusses how he is preparing for the company’s eventual return to sailing. He spoke during the virtual Bloomberg New Economy Conversations series."

Watch the video

 

The Fate of the Pullmantur Cruise Ships - Heading Back to Royal Caribbean

"We now know what will happen to the Pullmantur ships since the cruise line was dissolved, becoming the first victim of the cruise industry pause on operations. It has been revealed that Royal Caribbean Ltd. will welcome back the Pullmantur cruise ships along with all the crew members. According to El Confidencial, the Sovereign, Monarch, and Horizon cruise ships will be incorporated into Royal Caribbean, which is good news for the thousands of crew members who work onboard. The ships were being rented to Pullmantur and they are currently in a cold layup during the global suspension of cruise travel due to the COVID-19 pandemic." 

Read more

Additionally: https://m.facebook.com/notes/travels-with-anthony/monarch-and-sovereign-to-return-to-royal-caribbean/1394104434113883/

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

July 3, 2020

Keel Laid for First New Large Cruise Ship of the COVID-19 Era

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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