Issue #

138

|

Volume

8

July 15, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Sanitization and shipboard/tour bus capacities are top priorities, industry survey reveals
  • Costa Cruises Plans to Re-start Voyages on 7 Ships in 5 Phases
  • Cruise Ships Still Have Their Fans, Even After Coronavirus
  • COVID-19: an opportunity for design innovation?
  • Crew Member Opinion: When will cruising get back to normal?
  • Costa Cruises repatriates 200 Indonesian crew from Manila, Philippines
  • Malaga Cruise Port accredited as safe infrastructures preventing COVID-19
  • Coronavirus: Updated Cruise Ship Policies and Cancellations
  • Cruise CEOs insist ships are safe, prepare new health protocols
  • What happens when cruise ships retire
  • COVID-19 has halted the world's cruise ships. Now, what to do with them?
  • Fears for 40,000 cruise jobs as 'furious' industry slams advice telling ALL tourists to avoid holidays at sea while minister suggests trips won't be back until October
  • The perfect storm: What do you do with cruise ships that cannot set sail?
  • Carnival cruise lines plan 'staggered' comeback, won't return to full capacity until 2022
  • Carnival Boss Speaks Out on When Cruising Will be Back
  • Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard
  • Cruise Lines in Disarray Over Health as Countries Continue Bans
  • Bar Harbor bans all cruise ships for the rest of the year
  • Three Carnival Corp Cruise Ships to Begin Sailing Next Month

Cover Image by:

Sanitization and shipboard/tour bus capacities are top priorities, industry survey reveals

“A survey of industry professionals showed priority for tour bus capacity being reduced by half, a global disinfection program and compulsory COVID-19 tests of passengers ahead of travel. Of 136 respondents to the Inchcape Shipping Services survey, made up of cruise Lines, port agents/operators and/or tour agents, 19.4% listed sanitization their top priority, followed by social distancing (14.9%), shipboard capacity (14.8%), tours (13.4%), respirators (12.2%), F&B (12.2%) and insurance (10.2%).  On implementing effective health and hygiene measures, survey participants expressed a want for crew being positioned around lounges, entrances and stairwells, with continuous cleaning of surfaces carried out daily, and passengers encouraged to regularly use hand sanitizer. Adaption of ventilation systems to ensure no re-circulation of air from on board the ship was another point raised.” 

Read more

 

Costa Cruises Plans to Re-start Voyages on 7 Ships in 5 Phases

“The Italian cruise line Costa Cruises plans to resume sailings on seven of it’s cruise ships by the end of January 2021. According to the presentation, in the first phase of the plan only Italian guests will board the cruise ships, with limited occupancy and strict health and safety protocols. The first ships to resume cruising will sail round trips to Italian ports and with a possible stop in Valleta, Malta, according to the plan. Gradually in Phase 2 and 3 French and Spanish guests will be allowed to board the ships, and finally cruises will be open to all European citizens.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Still Have Their Fans, Even After Coronavirus

“The pandemic has thrown a sizable iceberg at the cruise industry, but long-term customer demand won’t crash.   Landlubbers who wrote this industry off for dead just don’t get it.  Cruise lines have navigated their share of hardships over the last several decades, but now they face what some see as a true existential threat from a mix of canceled business, heightened regulations, lawsuits and cleanup costs amid the pandemic. Fortunately for them, it seems hard-core cruise goers can’t wait to climb back aboard. Their loyalty should eventually resuscitate battered shares of major operators Carnival, Royal Caribbean Cruises and Norwegian...” 

Read more…

 

COVID-19: an opportunity for design innovation?

“In a webinar titled 'Collaboration – Not Competition,' authorities on architecture and design conveyed the message that COVID-19 offers a challenge to create contemporary and technologically sophisticated spaces.  In the webinar hosted by Tillberg Design of Sweden (TDoS), Lionel Ohayon, founder and CEO, iCRAVE; Greg Walton, partner and CEO, DADO; Chris Finch, founder and CEO, AD Associates; and Fredrik Johansson, director, TDoS, discussed their vision for cruise ship interior design.  ‘We can change behaviour and make cleaning areas sexy, with nice fragrances – something beautiful’, said Johansson, as he explained how handwashing stations before entering ships’ dining areas could successfully be made overt and welcoming.  In response, Ohayon suggested ‘enhancing the guest experience’ by taking responsibility for greater cleanliness away from passengers, with automatic lighting and fixtures to minimise the number of people touching the same surfaces. In addition to touchless faucets on taps, for instance, Ohayon spoke about the potential for lighting above sink basins that change from red to green depending on whether handwashing has been carried out when moving between areas.” 

Read more…

 

Crew Member Opinion: When will cruising get back to normal?

“Every question about the damage done by the coronavirus and when things will get back to normal for the cruise industry will be hard to answer. The following text is an honest opinion from a crew member sharing his thoughts about the future of cruising. A lot of crew are coming to me ....kapo, kapo ...when are ships starting again, etc etc. ?? Even I don't have that answer to the question. With this COVID-19 outbreak the cruising is experiencing unprecedented times .... something we've never seen before ...or likely to again I expect. My opinion is .....every continent/country is going to ease the "lockdown" at differing times etc, the flight situation has to get up running again properly & accommodation facilities near ports, etc ...including the ports themselves have to be open. All these factors are essential, among many others.” 

Read more

 

Costa Cruises repatriates 200 Indonesian crew from Manila, Philippines

“200 Indonesian crew members from Costa Cruises liners anchored off the coast of Manila (Luzon Island, Philippines) were repatriated Thursday evening, July 9.  The Indonesian citizens returned home via a Garuda chartered flight departing at 7:30 p.m. from Manila which landed at 10:25 p.m. at Soekarno Hatta International Airport in Jakarta, Java. The Indonesia Embassy team accompanied the crew members to the airport. All crew had taken the COVID-19 PCR, coming out negative. The repatriated Indonesian crew worked on 4 Costa Cruises ships: Costa Atlantica, Costa NeoRomantica, Costa Venezia, and Costa Serena, which have been in the waters of Manila Bay since April 2020.” 

Read more...

 

 

Malaga Cruise Port accredited as safe infrastructures preventing COVID-19

“Malaga Cruise Port obtained the ‘Safe Travels’ Stamp, as safe infrastructures preventing Coronavirus (COVID-19), granted by the leading global association in the sector, World Travel & Tourism Council. Despite the cruise traffic has been one of the most affected during the Coronavirus crisis, Malaga Cruise Port has worked in collaboration with Malaga Port Authority to implement sanitary measures that guarantee the safety of cruise ships, passengers, and crew. In this way, Port Malaga, along with Port Barcelona, has become ​​a pioneering port in obtaining international recognition.” 

Read more...

 

Coronavirus: Updated Cruise Ship Policies and Cancellations

“Cruise lines have temporarily suspended operations worldwide and altered future sailings globally as the novel coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) continues to spread. In January, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a public health emergency of international concern, following an emergency committee meeting in Geneva. On March 11, WHO declared the outbreak a worldwide pandemic.” 

Read more

 

Cruise CEOs insist ships are safe, prepare new health protocols

“Two of the world’s largest cruise operators insist their ships are no more vulnerable to the spread of the new coronavirus than other public places. The cruise industry has long pushed back at the idea that the close quarters on ships may be ripe conditions for the spread of disease. And major players continue to maintain that position, even though there have been more than 3,000 COVID-19 cases and dozens of deaths associated with ships, according to the Cruise Lines International Association. Top executives at Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. were asked last week to acknowledge that people are more likely to get coronavirus on a cruise ship than in the general public.” 

Read more

 

What happens when cruise ships retire

“Hundreds of cruise ships usually traverse the world's waters, but right now -- with the cruise industry on an indefinite hold due to the coronavirus pandemic -- they're mostly laid up at sea with no passengers. Last month, cruise giant Carnival Corporation announced plans to remove at least six cruise ships from its fleet, with 23-year-old Costa Victoria earmarked for demolition.  When the cruise industry tentatively restarts, it'll likely be on a smaller scale -- and vessels that were once star players could end up bowing out early.  But what happens when a cruise company decides to retire a ship?  Prior to 2020, the cruise industry was booming and ships could have a seafaring life spanning decade.  If a major company decided a ship was no longer needed, it would likely sell the vessel on to a smaller corporation. Rebranded and perhaps refurbished, the ship would then continue operations for many more years.” 

Read more

 

COVID-19 has halted the world's cruise ships. Now, what to do with them?

“Hundreds of people lined the banks of Glasgow’s River Clyde a few weeks ago for the rare sight of a small, high-end cruise ship sailing upriver–practically into the heart of the city. The Azamara Journey thrilled socially distanced onlookers by blasting its horn, typically a heralding of lively celebration. But this time nobody was there to wave on the deck of the 700-passenger ship, aside from the couple dozen members of its skeleton crew. This was no celebratory arrival, after all: it was a vessel on life support, just like every other ship dealing with the pandemic’s brutal wake. Since mid-March, only a small handful of the world’s 400-or-so cruise ships have been able to accept passengers–all on hyperlocal itineraries. A few dozen are sailing the world with purpose, repatriating crew members from every corner of the globe. The rest are sitting idle in cruise ship purgatory, unable to sail commercially for the foreseeable future. (In the U.S., the industry has agreed not to resume business at least until Sept. 15.)” 

Read more…

 

Fears for 40,000 cruise jobs as 'furious' industry slams advice telling ALL tourists to avoid holidays at sea while minister suggests trips won't be back until October

“As many as 40,000 cruise ship workers could lose their jobs it is feared as 'furious' industry bosses slammed advice telling tourists to avoid holidays at sea. But firms will be given the green light to welcome aboard passengers in October, a minister suggested amid angry demands from travel firms for clarity. Caroline Dinenage said the government wanted to be 'a little bit more secure' that ships will not be plunged into coronavirus hotbeds once again.  The culture minister said: 'We have at the moment dissuaded people from going on cruises, probably until October, just because of the situation that we were in when the crisis hit when we had to repatriate people from all over the world on cruise ships.' ”

Read more

 

The perfect storm: What do you do with cruise ships that cannot set sail?

“Hundreds of people lined the banks of Glasgow’s River Clyde a few weeks ago for the rare sight of a small, high-end cruise ship sailing upriver—practically into the heart of the city. The Azamara Journey thrilled socially distanced onlookers by blasting its horn, typically a heralding of lively celebration. But this time nobody was there to wave on the deck of the 700-passenger ship, aside from the couple dozen members of its skeleton crew. This was no celebratory arrival, after all: it was a vessel on life support, just like every other ship dealing with the pandemic’s brutal wake.” 

Read more

 

Carnival cruise lines plan 'staggered' comeback, won't return to full capacity until 2022

“Cruise giant Carnival plans a phased-in approach for its return to sailing, beginning with fewer ships and fewer passengers, on a region-by-region basis. The company will not make a full return in terms of passenger capacity until 2022 at the earliest, according to CEO Arnold Donald.  "[The] nature of restart is going to be almost country by country and destination by destination," Donald said on an earnings call Friday, four months after the company paused operations because of the coronavirus.  Carnival's restart will mimic international reopenings. The resumption of shoreside social gathering practices will be the "critical thing" as an indicator for the resumption of cruising. Donald pointed to Germany, where Carnival subsidiary AIDA Cruises will resume sailing three of its ships in August after the country began to reopen in the spring.  Italy, he suggested, might be next.”

Read more

 

Carnival Boss Speaks Out on When Cruising Will be Back

“Carnival Corporation, the owner of P&O Australia, Princess, Carnival Cruises, Holland America and Seabourn, is planning a staggered return to cruising – though there is no word yet when Australia will see ships.  The global cruise giant, which usually has P&O and Princess vessels in Australia and New Zealand year-round, will sail with fewer ships and a smaller number of passengers and will return region by region.

USA today quoted a Carnival Corp spokesperson as saying none of the company’s lines will sail “until at least early October”. While Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line have announced a joint committee to oversee their health protocols, Carnival has not yet announced plans for new measures to contain COVID-19 on its vessels. But CEO Arnold Donald, in a significant departure from his rivals at Royal Caribbean and Norwegian, acknowledged his ships will not sail full.” 

Read more

 

Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard

“Slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to virus, according to newly released data.   Cruise-ship workers suffered from more confirmed cases of Covid-19 than passengers, according to newly released government data, suggesting that a slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to the contagious virus.  Crew members also had more cases of “Covid-like illness” of undetermined cause than passengers, according to the data released Friday to The Wall Street Journal.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Lines in Disarray Over Health as Countries Continue Bans

“A series of announcements this week were greeted as breakthroughs in attempts to restart cruising in an age still coming to terms with coronavirus.

With the world’s fleets riding at anchor and tens of thousands of crews sent home, finding a solution to the “pausing” of cruise is a multi-billion-dollar business.  The first announcement featured an unlikely alliance of foes: Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line joined forces to create the rather strangely named Healthy Sail Panel – eleven eminent experts, including a former secretary of the US Department Health and Human Services and a former Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration. They are due to report in August.” 

Read more

 

Bar Harbor bans all cruise ships for the rest of the year

“Bar Harbor shut its doors to all cruise ships for the rest of the year on Tuesday night, after councilors heard a cruise line’s plans to restart small cruises this summer and fall.  The town, which normally gets more than 100 cruise ship visits annually between late April and early November, has had no cruise ship visits this year after the vessels became early hot spots for coronavirus transmission. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has barred cruise ships carrying 250 or more passengers from operating in U.S. waters through July 24, and a trade group representing cruise lines has decided that its members won’t resume cruises of that size until at least Sept. 15.” 

Read more… 

 

Three Carnival Corp Cruise Ships to Begin Sailing Next Month

“Carnival Corporation’s Aida Cruises, which is based in Germany, will begin cruises again starting from August 2020.  There is some good news for the cruise industry as the largest cruise line so far has announced that its cruises will restart from August. The Carnival-owned Aida Cruises will kick off operations once again, starting with three of its ships in Europe.  AIDAperla will be the first to set sail on August 5 from Hamburg, followed by AIDAmar from Rostock-Warnemünde on August 12, and AIDAblu from Kiel on August 16.”

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

138

|

Volume

8

July 15, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Sanitization and shipboard/tour bus capacities are top priorities, industry survey reveals
  • Costa Cruises Plans to Re-start Voyages on 7 Ships in 5 Phases
  • Cruise Ships Still Have Their Fans, Even After Coronavirus
  • COVID-19: an opportunity for design innovation?
  • Crew Member Opinion: When will cruising get back to normal?
  • Costa Cruises repatriates 200 Indonesian crew from Manila, Philippines
  • Malaga Cruise Port accredited as safe infrastructures preventing COVID-19
  • Coronavirus: Updated Cruise Ship Policies and Cancellations
  • Cruise CEOs insist ships are safe, prepare new health protocols
  • What happens when cruise ships retire
  • COVID-19 has halted the world's cruise ships. Now, what to do with them?
  • Fears for 40,000 cruise jobs as 'furious' industry slams advice telling ALL tourists to avoid holidays at sea while minister suggests trips won't be back until October
  • The perfect storm: What do you do with cruise ships that cannot set sail?
  • Carnival cruise lines plan 'staggered' comeback, won't return to full capacity until 2022
  • Carnival Boss Speaks Out on When Cruising Will be Back
  • Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard
  • Cruise Lines in Disarray Over Health as Countries Continue Bans
  • Bar Harbor bans all cruise ships for the rest of the year
  • Three Carnival Corp Cruise Ships to Begin Sailing Next Month

Cover Image by:

Sanitization and shipboard/tour bus capacities are top priorities, industry survey reveals

“A survey of industry professionals showed priority for tour bus capacity being reduced by half, a global disinfection program and compulsory COVID-19 tests of passengers ahead of travel. Of 136 respondents to the Inchcape Shipping Services survey, made up of cruise Lines, port agents/operators and/or tour agents, 19.4% listed sanitization their top priority, followed by social distancing (14.9%), shipboard capacity (14.8%), tours (13.4%), respirators (12.2%), F&B (12.2%) and insurance (10.2%).  On implementing effective health and hygiene measures, survey participants expressed a want for crew being positioned around lounges, entrances and stairwells, with continuous cleaning of surfaces carried out daily, and passengers encouraged to regularly use hand sanitizer. Adaption of ventilation systems to ensure no re-circulation of air from on board the ship was another point raised.” 

Read more

 

Costa Cruises Plans to Re-start Voyages on 7 Ships in 5 Phases

“The Italian cruise line Costa Cruises plans to resume sailings on seven of it’s cruise ships by the end of January 2021. According to the presentation, in the first phase of the plan only Italian guests will board the cruise ships, with limited occupancy and strict health and safety protocols. The first ships to resume cruising will sail round trips to Italian ports and with a possible stop in Valleta, Malta, according to the plan. Gradually in Phase 2 and 3 French and Spanish guests will be allowed to board the ships, and finally cruises will be open to all European citizens.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Ships Still Have Their Fans, Even After Coronavirus

“The pandemic has thrown a sizable iceberg at the cruise industry, but long-term customer demand won’t crash.   Landlubbers who wrote this industry off for dead just don’t get it.  Cruise lines have navigated their share of hardships over the last several decades, but now they face what some see as a true existential threat from a mix of canceled business, heightened regulations, lawsuits and cleanup costs amid the pandemic. Fortunately for them, it seems hard-core cruise goers can’t wait to climb back aboard. Their loyalty should eventually resuscitate battered shares of major operators Carnival, Royal Caribbean Cruises and Norwegian...” 

Read more…

 

COVID-19: an opportunity for design innovation?

“In a webinar titled 'Collaboration – Not Competition,' authorities on architecture and design conveyed the message that COVID-19 offers a challenge to create contemporary and technologically sophisticated spaces.  In the webinar hosted by Tillberg Design of Sweden (TDoS), Lionel Ohayon, founder and CEO, iCRAVE; Greg Walton, partner and CEO, DADO; Chris Finch, founder and CEO, AD Associates; and Fredrik Johansson, director, TDoS, discussed their vision for cruise ship interior design.  ‘We can change behaviour and make cleaning areas sexy, with nice fragrances – something beautiful’, said Johansson, as he explained how handwashing stations before entering ships’ dining areas could successfully be made overt and welcoming.  In response, Ohayon suggested ‘enhancing the guest experience’ by taking responsibility for greater cleanliness away from passengers, with automatic lighting and fixtures to minimise the number of people touching the same surfaces. In addition to touchless faucets on taps, for instance, Ohayon spoke about the potential for lighting above sink basins that change from red to green depending on whether handwashing has been carried out when moving between areas.” 

Read more…

 

Crew Member Opinion: When will cruising get back to normal?

“Every question about the damage done by the coronavirus and when things will get back to normal for the cruise industry will be hard to answer. The following text is an honest opinion from a crew member sharing his thoughts about the future of cruising. A lot of crew are coming to me ....kapo, kapo ...when are ships starting again, etc etc. ?? Even I don't have that answer to the question. With this COVID-19 outbreak the cruising is experiencing unprecedented times .... something we've never seen before ...or likely to again I expect. My opinion is .....every continent/country is going to ease the "lockdown" at differing times etc, the flight situation has to get up running again properly & accommodation facilities near ports, etc ...including the ports themselves have to be open. All these factors are essential, among many others.” 

Read more

 

Costa Cruises repatriates 200 Indonesian crew from Manila, Philippines

“200 Indonesian crew members from Costa Cruises liners anchored off the coast of Manila (Luzon Island, Philippines) were repatriated Thursday evening, July 9.  The Indonesian citizens returned home via a Garuda chartered flight departing at 7:30 p.m. from Manila which landed at 10:25 p.m. at Soekarno Hatta International Airport in Jakarta, Java. The Indonesia Embassy team accompanied the crew members to the airport. All crew had taken the COVID-19 PCR, coming out negative. The repatriated Indonesian crew worked on 4 Costa Cruises ships: Costa Atlantica, Costa NeoRomantica, Costa Venezia, and Costa Serena, which have been in the waters of Manila Bay since April 2020.” 

Read more...

 

 

Malaga Cruise Port accredited as safe infrastructures preventing COVID-19

“Malaga Cruise Port obtained the ‘Safe Travels’ Stamp, as safe infrastructures preventing Coronavirus (COVID-19), granted by the leading global association in the sector, World Travel & Tourism Council. Despite the cruise traffic has been one of the most affected during the Coronavirus crisis, Malaga Cruise Port has worked in collaboration with Malaga Port Authority to implement sanitary measures that guarantee the safety of cruise ships, passengers, and crew. In this way, Port Malaga, along with Port Barcelona, has become ​​a pioneering port in obtaining international recognition.” 

Read more...

 

Coronavirus: Updated Cruise Ship Policies and Cancellations

“Cruise lines have temporarily suspended operations worldwide and altered future sailings globally as the novel coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) continues to spread. In January, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a public health emergency of international concern, following an emergency committee meeting in Geneva. On March 11, WHO declared the outbreak a worldwide pandemic.” 

Read more

 

Cruise CEOs insist ships are safe, prepare new health protocols

“Two of the world’s largest cruise operators insist their ships are no more vulnerable to the spread of the new coronavirus than other public places. The cruise industry has long pushed back at the idea that the close quarters on ships may be ripe conditions for the spread of disease. And major players continue to maintain that position, even though there have been more than 3,000 COVID-19 cases and dozens of deaths associated with ships, according to the Cruise Lines International Association. Top executives at Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. were asked last week to acknowledge that people are more likely to get coronavirus on a cruise ship than in the general public.” 

Read more

 

What happens when cruise ships retire

“Hundreds of cruise ships usually traverse the world's waters, but right now -- with the cruise industry on an indefinite hold due to the coronavirus pandemic -- they're mostly laid up at sea with no passengers. Last month, cruise giant Carnival Corporation announced plans to remove at least six cruise ships from its fleet, with 23-year-old Costa Victoria earmarked for demolition.  When the cruise industry tentatively restarts, it'll likely be on a smaller scale -- and vessels that were once star players could end up bowing out early.  But what happens when a cruise company decides to retire a ship?  Prior to 2020, the cruise industry was booming and ships could have a seafaring life spanning decade.  If a major company decided a ship was no longer needed, it would likely sell the vessel on to a smaller corporation. Rebranded and perhaps refurbished, the ship would then continue operations for many more years.” 

Read more

 

COVID-19 has halted the world's cruise ships. Now, what to do with them?

“Hundreds of people lined the banks of Glasgow’s River Clyde a few weeks ago for the rare sight of a small, high-end cruise ship sailing upriver–practically into the heart of the city. The Azamara Journey thrilled socially distanced onlookers by blasting its horn, typically a heralding of lively celebration. But this time nobody was there to wave on the deck of the 700-passenger ship, aside from the couple dozen members of its skeleton crew. This was no celebratory arrival, after all: it was a vessel on life support, just like every other ship dealing with the pandemic’s brutal wake. Since mid-March, only a small handful of the world’s 400-or-so cruise ships have been able to accept passengers–all on hyperlocal itineraries. A few dozen are sailing the world with purpose, repatriating crew members from every corner of the globe. The rest are sitting idle in cruise ship purgatory, unable to sail commercially for the foreseeable future. (In the U.S., the industry has agreed not to resume business at least until Sept. 15.)” 

Read more…

 

Fears for 40,000 cruise jobs as 'furious' industry slams advice telling ALL tourists to avoid holidays at sea while minister suggests trips won't be back until October

“As many as 40,000 cruise ship workers could lose their jobs it is feared as 'furious' industry bosses slammed advice telling tourists to avoid holidays at sea. But firms will be given the green light to welcome aboard passengers in October, a minister suggested amid angry demands from travel firms for clarity. Caroline Dinenage said the government wanted to be 'a little bit more secure' that ships will not be plunged into coronavirus hotbeds once again.  The culture minister said: 'We have at the moment dissuaded people from going on cruises, probably until October, just because of the situation that we were in when the crisis hit when we had to repatriate people from all over the world on cruise ships.' ”

Read more

 

The perfect storm: What do you do with cruise ships that cannot set sail?

“Hundreds of people lined the banks of Glasgow’s River Clyde a few weeks ago for the rare sight of a small, high-end cruise ship sailing upriver—practically into the heart of the city. The Azamara Journey thrilled socially distanced onlookers by blasting its horn, typically a heralding of lively celebration. But this time nobody was there to wave on the deck of the 700-passenger ship, aside from the couple dozen members of its skeleton crew. This was no celebratory arrival, after all: it was a vessel on life support, just like every other ship dealing with the pandemic’s brutal wake.” 

Read more

 

Carnival cruise lines plan 'staggered' comeback, won't return to full capacity until 2022

“Cruise giant Carnival plans a phased-in approach for its return to sailing, beginning with fewer ships and fewer passengers, on a region-by-region basis. The company will not make a full return in terms of passenger capacity until 2022 at the earliest, according to CEO Arnold Donald.  "[The] nature of restart is going to be almost country by country and destination by destination," Donald said on an earnings call Friday, four months after the company paused operations because of the coronavirus.  Carnival's restart will mimic international reopenings. The resumption of shoreside social gathering practices will be the "critical thing" as an indicator for the resumption of cruising. Donald pointed to Germany, where Carnival subsidiary AIDA Cruises will resume sailing three of its ships in August after the country began to reopen in the spring.  Italy, he suggested, might be next.”

Read more

 

Carnival Boss Speaks Out on When Cruising Will be Back

“Carnival Corporation, the owner of P&O Australia, Princess, Carnival Cruises, Holland America and Seabourn, is planning a staggered return to cruising – though there is no word yet when Australia will see ships.  The global cruise giant, which usually has P&O and Princess vessels in Australia and New Zealand year-round, will sail with fewer ships and a smaller number of passengers and will return region by region.

USA today quoted a Carnival Corp spokesperson as saying none of the company’s lines will sail “until at least early October”. While Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line have announced a joint committee to oversee their health protocols, Carnival has not yet announced plans for new measures to contain COVID-19 on its vessels. But CEO Arnold Donald, in a significant departure from his rivals at Royal Caribbean and Norwegian, acknowledged his ships will not sail full.” 

Read more

 

Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard

“Slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to virus, according to newly released data.   Cruise-ship workers suffered from more confirmed cases of Covid-19 than passengers, according to newly released government data, suggesting that a slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to the contagious virus.  Crew members also had more cases of “Covid-like illness” of undetermined cause than passengers, according to the data released Friday to The Wall Street Journal.” 

Read more

 

Cruise Lines in Disarray Over Health as Countries Continue Bans

“A series of announcements this week were greeted as breakthroughs in attempts to restart cruising in an age still coming to terms with coronavirus.

With the world’s fleets riding at anchor and tens of thousands of crews sent home, finding a solution to the “pausing” of cruise is a multi-billion-dollar business.  The first announcement featured an unlikely alliance of foes: Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line joined forces to create the rather strangely named Healthy Sail Panel – eleven eminent experts, including a former secretary of the US Department Health and Human Services and a former Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration. They are due to report in August.” 

Read more

 

Bar Harbor bans all cruise ships for the rest of the year

“Bar Harbor shut its doors to all cruise ships for the rest of the year on Tuesday night, after councilors heard a cruise line’s plans to restart small cruises this summer and fall.  The town, which normally gets more than 100 cruise ship visits annually between late April and early November, has had no cruise ship visits this year after the vessels became early hot spots for coronavirus transmission. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has barred cruise ships carrying 250 or more passengers from operating in U.S. waters through July 24, and a trade group representing cruise lines has decided that its members won’t resume cruises of that size until at least Sept. 15.” 

Read more… 

 

Three Carnival Corp Cruise Ships to Begin Sailing Next Month

“Carnival Corporation’s Aida Cruises, which is based in Germany, will begin cruises again starting from August 2020.  There is some good news for the cruise industry as the largest cruise line so far has announced that its cruises will restart from August. The Carnival-owned Aida Cruises will kick off operations once again, starting with three of its ships in Europe.  AIDAperla will be the first to set sail on August 5 from Hamburg, followed by AIDAmar from Rostock-Warnemünde on August 12, and AIDAblu from Kiel on August 16.”

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

July 15, 2020

Sanitization and shipboard/tour bus capacities are top priorities, industry survey reveals

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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