Issue #

141

|

Volume

8

July 22, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • UK's FCO updates travel advice to allow river cruises
  • Royal Caribbean International cancels sailings through October 1
  • NZ Cruise Performer Finally Makes It Home After Multiple Quarantines
  • On Board PONANT, One of the First Ships Sailing in Europe
  • Cruise stocks hit hard as CDC extension of no-sail order could be just the beginning
  • Carnival Inspiration Reportedly Sold, Heads to Cruise Scrapyard
  • FCO confirms ban on UK ocean cruise voyages
  • COVID-19 spared Canada’s West Coast from cruise ship pollution: report
  • Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard
  • Putting a value on the loss of the cruise ship season
  • Cruises are restarting in the oddest of places, including (today) the Arctic Circle
  • Additional Delays for Return of Cruising in North America
  • Where are all of Royal Caribbean's cruise ships right now?
  • Cruises resume in the 1000 Islands with Stage 3 reopening
  • Hurtigruten returns 14 expedition cruise ships to operation

Cover Image by:

UK's FCO updates travel advice to allow river cruises

“It has been a week since the UK Government hindered the passenger shipping industry, with the FCO (UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office) advising against cruise ship travel. However, things are looking up, as the FCO updated that advice saying it relates only to ‘international travel’ on ‘sea-going cruise ships’. Under FCO's advice, British travellers considering ship cruising should now be able to embark on river cruises or sea cruises around the British Isles.  According to the latest advice, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office advised against cruise ship travel due to the ongoing Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and was based on medical advice from Public Health England. “Cruise ship travel means staying overnight for at least 1 night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households. Our advice against cruises applies to international travel on a ship that is exclusively for pleasure or recreation, providing overnight accommodation and other leisure facilities such as entertainment venues or swimming pools. Our advice does not include ferries or privately-rented boats. The government will continue to review its cruise ship travel advice based on the latest medical advice.” The advice against cruise ship travel came just a week after the UK government released a list of countries and territories deemed okay to travel to. When visiting one of the countries on the list Brits won't have to quarantine for 2 weeks upon arrival and return to the United Kingdom.” 

Read more…

 

Royal Caribbean International cancels sailings through October 1

“RCC-Royal Caribbean Cruises announced that they were canceling all sailings through October 1, 2020. The news comes after the U.S. CDC (Centers for Disease Control) extended its No Sail Order to the industry through September 30. Before the announcement, the cruise line had a return-to-service date of September 16. In a letter to travel partners, Royal Caribbean said that “in alignment with the guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), the suspension of all cruise operations is now extended through September 30, 2020 (excluding China sailings).” As part of Royal Caribbean Group, Celebrity Cruises also extended its pause in service, resuming on October 1, 2020.”

Read more

 

NZ Cruise Performer Finally Makes It Home After Multiple Quarantines

“A New Zealand-born performer is finally back home after being stuck on Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises’ ships in isolation since March. Lauren Marshall, who was working on Celebrity Eclipse off the coast of San Diego when a COVID case was discovered, has now completed her fourth round of 14-day isolation in Auckland. The 28-year-old, who had been performing musical theatre on the ship since July 2019, was one of just 300 people left on the 2852-passenger vessel after the case of COVID was diagnosed. She and the other remaining crew were confined to their cabins, getting patchy communications and irregular meals. As her friends and colleagues made their way home, she was moved to a balcony cabin to get fresh air and remained stuck on the ship for a month. She was then moved from California to Celebrity Reflection in Barbados, with the idea that it would be easier to fly home from outside the US, which was quickly becoming the epicenter of the virus.”

Read more

 

On Board PONANT, One of the First Ships Sailing in Europe

After four months of inactivity, Ponant received the green light from the French Government to restart operations on July 11. Mike Louagie was onboard the line’s le Dumont D’Urville.

Is this the future of cruising? We’re sailing from France on the le Dumont D’Urville.  Several new itineraries have been designed, with departures from French ports going to French destinations only – like Normandy, Brittany, Atlantic Coast and Corsica.  Two ships have also started cruising in Iceland and Spitsbergen.  The philosophy is that passengers are in a health bubble – the ship. Two days before embarking, we need to pass a COVID-19 test. Proof should be handed over at embarkation, where temperatures are checked. A doctor interviews passenger about health condition. Suitcases are disinfected. Onboard you have to wear masks in public spaces, as well as in the tender and on the zodiac. To enter the restaurant, you have to pass a temperature measurement device, which will grant access. Restaurant crew wears plexiglass face masks. The restaurant is à la carte only, with no buffets. Room service is possible.” 

Read more

 

Cruise stocks hit hard as CDC extension of no-sail order could be just the beginning

“Shares of cruise operators took a hard-hit Friday from the extension of the no-sail order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the wake of the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. The CDC said passenger operations on cruise ships with a capacity of at least 250 passengers in U.S. waters, must now be suspended through Sept. 30, 2020. The previous no-sail order was set to expire on July 24. The government action follows the decision by the Cruise Lines International Association announced in mid-June to extend the voluntary suspension of operations of cruise ship travel until Sept. 15.”

Read more

 

Carnival Inspiration Reportedly Sold, Heads to Cruise Scrapyard

“Just days after Carnival Fantasy was reportedly sold, sister ship Carnival Inspiration appears to be following in her older sister ship’s footsteps. Both vessels were previously in Curacao for the past week “offloading heavy equipment” before filing voyage plans for Izmir, Turkey. The voyages plan for Inspiration was filed on Friday afternoon with an August 1 arrival in Turkey. Carnival Inspiration was listed for sale on the vessel broker website YachtWorld up until late last month.” 

Read more…

 

FCO confirms ban on UK ocean cruise voyages

“British holidaymakers will not be allowed to go on cruises around the UK under the Government’s updated cruise ship travel advice, The Telegraph has been told. Although the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) clarified late on Wednesday night that river cruises are exempt from a warning to avoid cruise ship travel, there appeared to be a loophole that would also allow domestic sea cruising. The guidance states that “cruise ship travel means staying overnight for at least one night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households” but is followed by “our advice against cruises applies to international travel” – seemingly giving the go-ahead for itineraries that don’t go abroad...” 

Read more

 

COVID-19 spared Canada’s West Coast from cruise ship pollution: report

“The effective cancellation of Canada’s 2020 cruise ship season due to the COVID-19 pandemic has saved British Columbia’s coast from exposure to billions of litres of pollution spewed by dozens of cruise ships that usually visit the Pacific Coast province, says a report by an international environmental group.  The report by Stand.earth released earlier this week, claims that more than 32 billion litres of sewage, greywater and washwater from scrubbers – systems designed to “scrub” exhaust fumes generated by the ship’s engines of harmful sulphur pollution – are dumped in Canadian coastal waters in the Salish and Great Bear seas every year by the cruise industry. These discharges – with about 30 billion litres generated by the scrubbers – contain a variety of pollutants, including fecal coliform, ammonia, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are harmful to aquatic organisms and coastal ecosystems, the report says. The report says that the cruise ship industry on the West Coast has exploded over the last decade. In 2019, more than one million passengers and crew from 30 different cruise ships visited the Victoria cruise terminal during 256 ship calls on their way to and from Alaska, the report says…” 

Read more

 

Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard

“Cruise-ship workers suffered from more confirmed cases of Covid-19 than passengers, according to newly released government data, suggesting that a slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to the contagious virus. Crew members also had more cases of “Covid-like illness” of undetermined cause than passengers, according to the data released Friday to The Wall Street Journal.”

Read more

 

Putting a value on the loss of the cruise ship season

“LERWICK Port Authority says it is too early to put a figure on the economic impact caused by the loss of this year’s cruise ship season – but the local tourism industry estimates the loss of income will amount to millions. At the start of the year the port was confident to set another record-breaking season with over 100 cruise ships to call bringing an expected 90,000 visitors to the isles. But after Covid-19 struck in early March and its implications began to turn life upside down, tourism, and with it the cruise ship sector, was effectively wiped out by the pandemic. There was something of an uproar in the community when the Magellan called at Lerwick harbour on 13 March and passengers were allowed to land at a time Shetland had already six confirmed coronavirus cases. At the time Lerwick Port Authority said all the protocols had been followed with screening and pre-arriving boarding checks being carried out. Since then most of the 100 or so arrivals of cruise ships have been cancelled with just 12 cruise ships and three sail training vessels (Statsraad Lehmkuhl) left in the diary between 8 August and 14 October.” 

Read more…

 

Cruises are restarting in the oddest of places, including (today) the Arctic Circle

“If you asked us a few months ago where we thought cruising would come back first, we’re pretty sure we wouldn’t have said the Arctic Circle.  But starting today, that’s exactly where some of the first cruises since the start of the coronavirus-caused cruising shutdown will take place. Norwegian cruise expedition company Hurtigruten today is resuming trips to the Arctic’s wildlife-filled Svalbard archipelago with two ships: the 335-passenger Spitsbergen and the 530-passenger Roald Amundsen. Both vessels will operate at a sharply reduced capacity of 120 and 250 passengers, respectively, to ensure social distancing. Spitsbergen will operate four- to five-day Svalbard sailings out of Longyearbyen, a small town in the archipelago. Roald Amundsen will operate seven- to 15-day expedition cruises to the archipelago from Tromso, Norway. The Spitsbergen trips will begin today for passengers with flights to Longyearbyen and an overnight in a local hotel. The ship will depart from Longyearbyen on Friday. The Roald Amundsen trips will begin on Friday.” 

Read more

 

Additional Delays for Return of Cruising in North America

“The resurgence of the coronavirus across the southern United States is causing the North American cruise industry to delay plans for its return to service. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has yet to announce what actions, if any, it would take regarding cruising and the current no sail order, the individual cruise lines have announced delays to their planned resumption of service. Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line had announced plans to become the first ocean-going cruise line to resume service in North America on July 25 the day after the expiration of the current no sail order. The company, which operates 2-night cruises for the Port of Palm Beach to Grand Bahama Island, however, announced that it would now be delaying its return to service until August 28. “Over the past few weeks, we’ve continued preparations to return to Grand Bahama Island while keeping an eye on the overall landscape, which continues to evolve. In recent days, amidst a spike in COVID-19 cases in many states across the country, we’ve seen mounting pressures to modify reopening plans and consideration of the return of stay-at-home orders,” said Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line CEO Oneil Khosa. “Additionally, new restrictions from the Bahamas have been announced, requiring travelers to present a negative swab test prior to entry. In an effort to provide the safest environment for our passengers and crew, we have no choice but to further postpone our sailing schedule.” ” 

Read more

 

Where are all of Royal Caribbean's cruise ships right now?

“Ever since Royal Caribbean shut down cruises in March, many cruise fans have wanted to know where the cruise ships are in the world.  Royal Caribbean's 26 ships are spread throughout the world, with many having spent time getting crew members back to their home country.  Royal Caribbean's ships are currently spread out around the world, but "are ready and anxious to come back, and we're making sure that when we have the opportunity to do so, we will be able to do so as quickly as possible," Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. Chairman and CEO Richard Fain said.”  

Read more…

 

Cruises resume in the 1000 Islands with Stage 3 reopening

“After a long three-month wait, Rockport Cruises is back on the water in the 1000 Islands. "Today finally is our first day of cruises!” said Kathleen Allen, President and General Manager of Rockport Cruises on Friday morning. "The phone has been ringing off the hook, so we’re very happy about that....to be able to let people know that we are open.”

The cruise line has only one boat in the water at the moment and only offering the one-and-a-half-hour cruise option. COVID-19 safety protocols are in place on the boat to keep staff and visitors safe. “Of course, we are at reduced capacity but it allows us to run with a maximum of 50 passengers. It at least gets us started with our season,” Allen said.”

Read more…

 

Hurtigruten returns 14 expedition cruise ships to operation

“After successfully restarting passenger shipping operations in June, Hurtigruten announced plans to further expand operations with a total of 14 (out of 16 total) cruise ships returning in August and September 2020. In addition, the Norwegian company launches new itineraries in the British Isles over the next months. Hurtigruten marked the return to operation as its MS Finnmarken (renamed to MS Otto Sverdrup) became the world's first ocean cruise ship to return to sailing (on June 16). With strict hygiene measures and limited capacity, Hurtigruten now operates 5 ships on domestic and international Norwegian itineraries. Hurtigruten (currently the world's largest expedition cruise company) stepped up its rebound strategy, revealing plans to bring 14 of the fleet's 16 vessels back to sailing by late-September. The company's Arctic expedition program is based on battery-hybrid powered ships (MS Spitsbergen and MS Roald Amundsen) and restarts in mid-July with 6- to 15-day roundtrips to Norway's Svalbard Archipelago.”

Read more

 

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

141

|

Volume

8

July 22, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • UK's FCO updates travel advice to allow river cruises
  • Royal Caribbean International cancels sailings through October 1
  • NZ Cruise Performer Finally Makes It Home After Multiple Quarantines
  • On Board PONANT, One of the First Ships Sailing in Europe
  • Cruise stocks hit hard as CDC extension of no-sail order could be just the beginning
  • Carnival Inspiration Reportedly Sold, Heads to Cruise Scrapyard
  • FCO confirms ban on UK ocean cruise voyages
  • COVID-19 spared Canada’s West Coast from cruise ship pollution: report
  • Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard
  • Putting a value on the loss of the cruise ship season
  • Cruises are restarting in the oddest of places, including (today) the Arctic Circle
  • Additional Delays for Return of Cruising in North America
  • Where are all of Royal Caribbean's cruise ships right now?
  • Cruises resume in the 1000 Islands with Stage 3 reopening
  • Hurtigruten returns 14 expedition cruise ships to operation

Cover Image by:

UK's FCO updates travel advice to allow river cruises

“It has been a week since the UK Government hindered the passenger shipping industry, with the FCO (UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office) advising against cruise ship travel. However, things are looking up, as the FCO updated that advice saying it relates only to ‘international travel’ on ‘sea-going cruise ships’. Under FCO's advice, British travellers considering ship cruising should now be able to embark on river cruises or sea cruises around the British Isles.  According to the latest advice, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office advised against cruise ship travel due to the ongoing Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and was based on medical advice from Public Health England. “Cruise ship travel means staying overnight for at least 1 night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households. Our advice against cruises applies to international travel on a ship that is exclusively for pleasure or recreation, providing overnight accommodation and other leisure facilities such as entertainment venues or swimming pools. Our advice does not include ferries or privately-rented boats. The government will continue to review its cruise ship travel advice based on the latest medical advice.” The advice against cruise ship travel came just a week after the UK government released a list of countries and territories deemed okay to travel to. When visiting one of the countries on the list Brits won't have to quarantine for 2 weeks upon arrival and return to the United Kingdom.” 

Read more…

 

Royal Caribbean International cancels sailings through October 1

“RCC-Royal Caribbean Cruises announced that they were canceling all sailings through October 1, 2020. The news comes after the U.S. CDC (Centers for Disease Control) extended its No Sail Order to the industry through September 30. Before the announcement, the cruise line had a return-to-service date of September 16. In a letter to travel partners, Royal Caribbean said that “in alignment with the guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), the suspension of all cruise operations is now extended through September 30, 2020 (excluding China sailings).” As part of Royal Caribbean Group, Celebrity Cruises also extended its pause in service, resuming on October 1, 2020.”

Read more

 

NZ Cruise Performer Finally Makes It Home After Multiple Quarantines

“A New Zealand-born performer is finally back home after being stuck on Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises’ ships in isolation since March. Lauren Marshall, who was working on Celebrity Eclipse off the coast of San Diego when a COVID case was discovered, has now completed her fourth round of 14-day isolation in Auckland. The 28-year-old, who had been performing musical theatre on the ship since July 2019, was one of just 300 people left on the 2852-passenger vessel after the case of COVID was diagnosed. She and the other remaining crew were confined to their cabins, getting patchy communications and irregular meals. As her friends and colleagues made their way home, she was moved to a balcony cabin to get fresh air and remained stuck on the ship for a month. She was then moved from California to Celebrity Reflection in Barbados, with the idea that it would be easier to fly home from outside the US, which was quickly becoming the epicenter of the virus.”

Read more

 

On Board PONANT, One of the First Ships Sailing in Europe

After four months of inactivity, Ponant received the green light from the French Government to restart operations on July 11. Mike Louagie was onboard the line’s le Dumont D’Urville.

Is this the future of cruising? We’re sailing from France on the le Dumont D’Urville.  Several new itineraries have been designed, with departures from French ports going to French destinations only – like Normandy, Brittany, Atlantic Coast and Corsica.  Two ships have also started cruising in Iceland and Spitsbergen.  The philosophy is that passengers are in a health bubble – the ship. Two days before embarking, we need to pass a COVID-19 test. Proof should be handed over at embarkation, where temperatures are checked. A doctor interviews passenger about health condition. Suitcases are disinfected. Onboard you have to wear masks in public spaces, as well as in the tender and on the zodiac. To enter the restaurant, you have to pass a temperature measurement device, which will grant access. Restaurant crew wears plexiglass face masks. The restaurant is à la carte only, with no buffets. Room service is possible.” 

Read more

 

Cruise stocks hit hard as CDC extension of no-sail order could be just the beginning

“Shares of cruise operators took a hard-hit Friday from the extension of the no-sail order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the wake of the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. The CDC said passenger operations on cruise ships with a capacity of at least 250 passengers in U.S. waters, must now be suspended through Sept. 30, 2020. The previous no-sail order was set to expire on July 24. The government action follows the decision by the Cruise Lines International Association announced in mid-June to extend the voluntary suspension of operations of cruise ship travel until Sept. 15.”

Read more

 

Carnival Inspiration Reportedly Sold, Heads to Cruise Scrapyard

“Just days after Carnival Fantasy was reportedly sold, sister ship Carnival Inspiration appears to be following in her older sister ship’s footsteps. Both vessels were previously in Curacao for the past week “offloading heavy equipment” before filing voyage plans for Izmir, Turkey. The voyages plan for Inspiration was filed on Friday afternoon with an August 1 arrival in Turkey. Carnival Inspiration was listed for sale on the vessel broker website YachtWorld up until late last month.” 

Read more…

 

FCO confirms ban on UK ocean cruise voyages

“British holidaymakers will not be allowed to go on cruises around the UK under the Government’s updated cruise ship travel advice, The Telegraph has been told. Although the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) clarified late on Wednesday night that river cruises are exempt from a warning to avoid cruise ship travel, there appeared to be a loophole that would also allow domestic sea cruising. The guidance states that “cruise ship travel means staying overnight for at least one night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households” but is followed by “our advice against cruises applies to international travel” – seemingly giving the go-ahead for itineraries that don’t go abroad...” 

Read more

 

COVID-19 spared Canada’s West Coast from cruise ship pollution: report

“The effective cancellation of Canada’s 2020 cruise ship season due to the COVID-19 pandemic has saved British Columbia’s coast from exposure to billions of litres of pollution spewed by dozens of cruise ships that usually visit the Pacific Coast province, says a report by an international environmental group.  The report by Stand.earth released earlier this week, claims that more than 32 billion litres of sewage, greywater and washwater from scrubbers – systems designed to “scrub” exhaust fumes generated by the ship’s engines of harmful sulphur pollution – are dumped in Canadian coastal waters in the Salish and Great Bear seas every year by the cruise industry. These discharges – with about 30 billion litres generated by the scrubbers – contain a variety of pollutants, including fecal coliform, ammonia, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are harmful to aquatic organisms and coastal ecosystems, the report says. The report says that the cruise ship industry on the West Coast has exploded over the last decade. In 2019, more than one million passengers and crew from 30 different cruise ships visited the Victoria cruise terminal during 256 ship calls on their way to and from Alaska, the report says…” 

Read more

 

Covid-19 Hits Cruise-Ship Crews Hard

“Cruise-ship workers suffered from more confirmed cases of Covid-19 than passengers, according to newly released government data, suggesting that a slow, arduous process for repatriating idled crew members increased their exposure to the contagious virus. Crew members also had more cases of “Covid-like illness” of undetermined cause than passengers, according to the data released Friday to The Wall Street Journal.”

Read more

 

Putting a value on the loss of the cruise ship season

“LERWICK Port Authority says it is too early to put a figure on the economic impact caused by the loss of this year’s cruise ship season – but the local tourism industry estimates the loss of income will amount to millions. At the start of the year the port was confident to set another record-breaking season with over 100 cruise ships to call bringing an expected 90,000 visitors to the isles. But after Covid-19 struck in early March and its implications began to turn life upside down, tourism, and with it the cruise ship sector, was effectively wiped out by the pandemic. There was something of an uproar in the community when the Magellan called at Lerwick harbour on 13 March and passengers were allowed to land at a time Shetland had already six confirmed coronavirus cases. At the time Lerwick Port Authority said all the protocols had been followed with screening and pre-arriving boarding checks being carried out. Since then most of the 100 or so arrivals of cruise ships have been cancelled with just 12 cruise ships and three sail training vessels (Statsraad Lehmkuhl) left in the diary between 8 August and 14 October.” 

Read more…

 

Cruises are restarting in the oddest of places, including (today) the Arctic Circle

“If you asked us a few months ago where we thought cruising would come back first, we’re pretty sure we wouldn’t have said the Arctic Circle.  But starting today, that’s exactly where some of the first cruises since the start of the coronavirus-caused cruising shutdown will take place. Norwegian cruise expedition company Hurtigruten today is resuming trips to the Arctic’s wildlife-filled Svalbard archipelago with two ships: the 335-passenger Spitsbergen and the 530-passenger Roald Amundsen. Both vessels will operate at a sharply reduced capacity of 120 and 250 passengers, respectively, to ensure social distancing. Spitsbergen will operate four- to five-day Svalbard sailings out of Longyearbyen, a small town in the archipelago. Roald Amundsen will operate seven- to 15-day expedition cruises to the archipelago from Tromso, Norway. The Spitsbergen trips will begin today for passengers with flights to Longyearbyen and an overnight in a local hotel. The ship will depart from Longyearbyen on Friday. The Roald Amundsen trips will begin on Friday.” 

Read more

 

Additional Delays for Return of Cruising in North America

“The resurgence of the coronavirus across the southern United States is causing the North American cruise industry to delay plans for its return to service. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has yet to announce what actions, if any, it would take regarding cruising and the current no sail order, the individual cruise lines have announced delays to their planned resumption of service. Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line had announced plans to become the first ocean-going cruise line to resume service in North America on July 25 the day after the expiration of the current no sail order. The company, which operates 2-night cruises for the Port of Palm Beach to Grand Bahama Island, however, announced that it would now be delaying its return to service until August 28. “Over the past few weeks, we’ve continued preparations to return to Grand Bahama Island while keeping an eye on the overall landscape, which continues to evolve. In recent days, amidst a spike in COVID-19 cases in many states across the country, we’ve seen mounting pressures to modify reopening plans and consideration of the return of stay-at-home orders,” said Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line CEO Oneil Khosa. “Additionally, new restrictions from the Bahamas have been announced, requiring travelers to present a negative swab test prior to entry. In an effort to provide the safest environment for our passengers and crew, we have no choice but to further postpone our sailing schedule.” ” 

Read more

 

Where are all of Royal Caribbean's cruise ships right now?

“Ever since Royal Caribbean shut down cruises in March, many cruise fans have wanted to know where the cruise ships are in the world.  Royal Caribbean's 26 ships are spread throughout the world, with many having spent time getting crew members back to their home country.  Royal Caribbean's ships are currently spread out around the world, but "are ready and anxious to come back, and we're making sure that when we have the opportunity to do so, we will be able to do so as quickly as possible," Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. Chairman and CEO Richard Fain said.”  

Read more…

 

Cruises resume in the 1000 Islands with Stage 3 reopening

“After a long three-month wait, Rockport Cruises is back on the water in the 1000 Islands. "Today finally is our first day of cruises!” said Kathleen Allen, President and General Manager of Rockport Cruises on Friday morning. "The phone has been ringing off the hook, so we’re very happy about that....to be able to let people know that we are open.”

The cruise line has only one boat in the water at the moment and only offering the one-and-a-half-hour cruise option. COVID-19 safety protocols are in place on the boat to keep staff and visitors safe. “Of course, we are at reduced capacity but it allows us to run with a maximum of 50 passengers. It at least gets us started with our season,” Allen said.”

Read more…

 

Hurtigruten returns 14 expedition cruise ships to operation

“After successfully restarting passenger shipping operations in June, Hurtigruten announced plans to further expand operations with a total of 14 (out of 16 total) cruise ships returning in August and September 2020. In addition, the Norwegian company launches new itineraries in the British Isles over the next months. Hurtigruten marked the return to operation as its MS Finnmarken (renamed to MS Otto Sverdrup) became the world's first ocean cruise ship to return to sailing (on June 16). With strict hygiene measures and limited capacity, Hurtigruten now operates 5 ships on domestic and international Norwegian itineraries. Hurtigruten (currently the world's largest expedition cruise company) stepped up its rebound strategy, revealing plans to bring 14 of the fleet's 16 vessels back to sailing by late-September. The company's Arctic expedition program is based on battery-hybrid powered ships (MS Spitsbergen and MS Roald Amundsen) and restarts in mid-July with 6- to 15-day roundtrips to Norway's Svalbard Archipelago.”

Read more

 

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

July 22, 2020

UK's FCO updates travel advice to allow river cruises

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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