Issue #

217

|

Volume

14

January 18, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • What Cruise Lines Need to Get Right in 2021
  • Cruise Ships | Working at Sea
  • Cruising: Building confidence & inspiring hope for 2021
  • Coral Expeditions' cruise ship Coral Discoverer to circumnavigate Tasmania
  • A Diverse Class of 2021 as 46 New Cruise Ships Could Debut
  • Halifax Cruise Port: What to Do While Docked
  • Despite the Pandemic, 16 New Cruise Ships Were Delivered in 2020
  • Royal Caribbean Group: 15 Steps Crew Needs to Follow Before Re-Joining
  • Here are the top findings from CLIA’s 2021 Industry Outlook report
  • Cruise Ships Back In-Service January 2021 Update

Cover Image by:

Image by: George H. Vaughan

What Cruise Lines Need to Get Right in 2021

The year 2020 started great, with cruise lines predicting record bookings at the start of the year and passenger numbers projected to jump up by several million compared to 2019.  How different things became in February and March. With COVID-19 outbreaks on several vessels, ships detained in ports worldwide, crew members stuck on board for many months, and the cruise industry under immense scrutiny from government agencies and the mainstream press, 2020 turned out to be a year many will want to forget.  If cruising is to become the place that millions choose for their holidays, cruise lines will need to tread carefully in 2021. We look at what cruise lines will need to do to make 2021 a success and bring back cruising, as we all know and love.  The Framework for conditional sailing is already putting a significant strain on the industry. The protocols and regulations that have been put in place will cost the cruise line industry millions, if not billions, to implement.  However, if cruising is to come back, there is no way that these measures should not be implemented. 

Read more….

Cruise Ships | Working at Sea

Many young aspiring chefs often contemplate about working on a cruise ship.  The cruise industry offers various jobs for hospitality professionals and an opportunity to see the world at the same time.  Travel is a big part of the allure for cruise line employees and it offers invaluable educational experiences.  So, when young aspiring chefs ask me about working at sea, I tell them that they must be ready to eat, sleep, and live in a fast-paced working environment for months at a time with no days off.  If knowing the working conditions, you still have the ambition to work for a cruise line, by all means, do it and you’ll have an experience of a lifetime that goes far beyond cooking.  And who knows, you just might get to meet one of your favorite chefs while cooking on the high seas! 

Read more…. 

 

Cruising: Building confidence & inspiring hope for 2021

The cruise industry is widely regarded as one of the most resilient in travel, accustomed to navigating through challenges like hurricanes, tropical storms and viral outbreaks such as H1N1. But in 2020, cruising finally met its match in COVID-19, the global health crisis that forced a complete and utterly devastating shutdown of the entire industry. First came outbreaks on two Princess Cruises ships in February and March, followed by the CDC’s No Sail Order on March 14, a blanket-wide measure that effectively suspended all cruise ship operations of 250 or more passengers in the United States. Two days later, CLIA, which represents over 50 cruise lines and more than 95% of global cruise capacity, made the extraordinary move to voluntarily and temporarily suspend all ocean-going cruise ship operations from and to U.S. ports of call.  A few days after that, on March 19, the Government of Canada followed suit with a cruise ban of its own that applied to ships carrying more than 100 people in Canadian waters.  In one fell swoop ships became dead in the water, an unprecedented scenario for the once formidable cruise industry. 

Read more…

 

Coral Expeditions' cruise ship Coral Discoverer to circumnavigate Tasmania

A cruise ship carrying a total of 60 passengers from non-hotspot areas of the country will commence a circumnavigation of Tasmania on New Year's Day.  According to the head of the Cairns-based company behind the cruise, "clear and robust" COVID protocols were being followed.  The 63-metre Coral Discoverer ship anchored at Coles Bay and is scheduled to arrive in Hobart on January 1, 2021, where she will embark on a 16-night voyage around the state, making stops at destinations like Wineglass Bay, Flinders Island, Stanley, Launceston, King Island as well as Tasmania's West Coast. 

Read more….

 

A Diverse Class of 2021 as 46 New Cruise Ships Could Debut

A glimpse at the 2021 cruise ship orderbook shows 30 cruise ships set to debut, plus 16 more ships that were delivered in 2020, most of which did not see revenue service and sit waiting. The 30 ships expected in 2021 would mean a quickly rebounding cruise market plus the recovery of the global supply chain of vendors which has been slowed down by the pandemic, pushing shipyard delivery dates out into the future.  

Read more….

 

Halifax Cruise Port: What to Do While Docked

Situated on the eastern coast of Canada on one of the largest natural harbors in the world, Halifax is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia and the largest metropolitan area on Canada’s Atlantic Coast.  A popular port of call on Canada and New England cruises, ships dock at piers 20 and 22 near the downtown area — providing passengers convenient ship-to-shore access. 

Read more…..

 

Despite the Pandemic, 16 New Cruise Ships Were Delivered in 2020

Sixteen new cruise ships were delivered in 2020, including three before the COVID-19 crisis was declared a pandemic, while most delivered after have yet to see revenue guests and await their official debuts in 2021.

Read more….

 

Royal Caribbean Group: 15 Steps Crew Needs to Follow Before Re-Joining

Royal Caribbean Group announced a 15-point plan aimed at the safe return of the shipboard employees which all the crew needs to follow while traveling from home to join the vessel. After receiving a call from the company and all necessary documents are completed, such as Letter of Employment and Medical Examinations, the crew needs to self-quarantine and get tested for Covid-19. If the PCR test is negative the crew member will be allowed to travel back to the ship. There will be two additional quarantines before the crew member is allowed to work, one in a hotel near the port and another onboard the ship. After completing the quarantine period onboard, the crew member will be tested once again and if the PCR test is negative means he/she is ready to work.  Each crew member needs to take these steps very seriously in order to safeguard his own safety, as well as the safety of the fellow crew and ultimately not to compromise the restart of the cruise industry. 

Read more….

 

Here are the top findings from CLIA’s 2021 Industry Outlook report

The cruise industry is poised for a recovery year in 2021, with two out of three cruisers willing to sail again within a year.  The findings were unveiled in CLIA’s newly released ‘2021 State of the Cruise Industry Outlook’ report, which also found that 58% of international vacations who have never cruised before will likely cruise in the next few years.  These are welcoming findings following a devastating impact of COVID-19 in 2020.  “2020 was a year unlike any other and I am proud of how our industry has united together to weather this unparalleled pandemic,” said Adam Goldstein, CLIA Chairman. “As we look to 2021, I know that cruisers are eager to set sail once more, just as our industry is eager to put people back to work and create unforgettable experiences for our valued guests.”  Here are additional findings from the report…. 

Read more

Cruise Ships Back In-Service January 2021 Update

A number of cruise ships are sailing globally in January as the industry continues its restart, in a staggered phased-in approach with an emphasis on regional startups.  Here are the cruise ships currently back in service or planning restarts in January 2021…

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

217

|

Volume

14

January 18, 2021

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • What Cruise Lines Need to Get Right in 2021
  • Cruise Ships | Working at Sea
  • Cruising: Building confidence & inspiring hope for 2021
  • Coral Expeditions' cruise ship Coral Discoverer to circumnavigate Tasmania
  • A Diverse Class of 2021 as 46 New Cruise Ships Could Debut
  • Halifax Cruise Port: What to Do While Docked
  • Despite the Pandemic, 16 New Cruise Ships Were Delivered in 2020
  • Royal Caribbean Group: 15 Steps Crew Needs to Follow Before Re-Joining
  • Here are the top findings from CLIA’s 2021 Industry Outlook report
  • Cruise Ships Back In-Service January 2021 Update

Cover Image by:

Image by: George H. Vaughan

What Cruise Lines Need to Get Right in 2021

The year 2020 started great, with cruise lines predicting record bookings at the start of the year and passenger numbers projected to jump up by several million compared to 2019.  How different things became in February and March. With COVID-19 outbreaks on several vessels, ships detained in ports worldwide, crew members stuck on board for many months, and the cruise industry under immense scrutiny from government agencies and the mainstream press, 2020 turned out to be a year many will want to forget.  If cruising is to become the place that millions choose for their holidays, cruise lines will need to tread carefully in 2021. We look at what cruise lines will need to do to make 2021 a success and bring back cruising, as we all know and love.  The Framework for conditional sailing is already putting a significant strain on the industry. The protocols and regulations that have been put in place will cost the cruise line industry millions, if not billions, to implement.  However, if cruising is to come back, there is no way that these measures should not be implemented. 

Read more….

Cruise Ships | Working at Sea

Many young aspiring chefs often contemplate about working on a cruise ship.  The cruise industry offers various jobs for hospitality professionals and an opportunity to see the world at the same time.  Travel is a big part of the allure for cruise line employees and it offers invaluable educational experiences.  So, when young aspiring chefs ask me about working at sea, I tell them that they must be ready to eat, sleep, and live in a fast-paced working environment for months at a time with no days off.  If knowing the working conditions, you still have the ambition to work for a cruise line, by all means, do it and you’ll have an experience of a lifetime that goes far beyond cooking.  And who knows, you just might get to meet one of your favorite chefs while cooking on the high seas! 

Read more…. 

 

Cruising: Building confidence & inspiring hope for 2021

The cruise industry is widely regarded as one of the most resilient in travel, accustomed to navigating through challenges like hurricanes, tropical storms and viral outbreaks such as H1N1. But in 2020, cruising finally met its match in COVID-19, the global health crisis that forced a complete and utterly devastating shutdown of the entire industry. First came outbreaks on two Princess Cruises ships in February and March, followed by the CDC’s No Sail Order on March 14, a blanket-wide measure that effectively suspended all cruise ship operations of 250 or more passengers in the United States. Two days later, CLIA, which represents over 50 cruise lines and more than 95% of global cruise capacity, made the extraordinary move to voluntarily and temporarily suspend all ocean-going cruise ship operations from and to U.S. ports of call.  A few days after that, on March 19, the Government of Canada followed suit with a cruise ban of its own that applied to ships carrying more than 100 people in Canadian waters.  In one fell swoop ships became dead in the water, an unprecedented scenario for the once formidable cruise industry. 

Read more…

 

Coral Expeditions' cruise ship Coral Discoverer to circumnavigate Tasmania

A cruise ship carrying a total of 60 passengers from non-hotspot areas of the country will commence a circumnavigation of Tasmania on New Year's Day.  According to the head of the Cairns-based company behind the cruise, "clear and robust" COVID protocols were being followed.  The 63-metre Coral Discoverer ship anchored at Coles Bay and is scheduled to arrive in Hobart on January 1, 2021, where she will embark on a 16-night voyage around the state, making stops at destinations like Wineglass Bay, Flinders Island, Stanley, Launceston, King Island as well as Tasmania's West Coast. 

Read more….

 

A Diverse Class of 2021 as 46 New Cruise Ships Could Debut

A glimpse at the 2021 cruise ship orderbook shows 30 cruise ships set to debut, plus 16 more ships that were delivered in 2020, most of which did not see revenue service and sit waiting. The 30 ships expected in 2021 would mean a quickly rebounding cruise market plus the recovery of the global supply chain of vendors which has been slowed down by the pandemic, pushing shipyard delivery dates out into the future.  

Read more….

 

Halifax Cruise Port: What to Do While Docked

Situated on the eastern coast of Canada on one of the largest natural harbors in the world, Halifax is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia and the largest metropolitan area on Canada’s Atlantic Coast.  A popular port of call on Canada and New England cruises, ships dock at piers 20 and 22 near the downtown area — providing passengers convenient ship-to-shore access. 

Read more…..

 

Despite the Pandemic, 16 New Cruise Ships Were Delivered in 2020

Sixteen new cruise ships were delivered in 2020, including three before the COVID-19 crisis was declared a pandemic, while most delivered after have yet to see revenue guests and await their official debuts in 2021.

Read more….

 

Royal Caribbean Group: 15 Steps Crew Needs to Follow Before Re-Joining

Royal Caribbean Group announced a 15-point plan aimed at the safe return of the shipboard employees which all the crew needs to follow while traveling from home to join the vessel. After receiving a call from the company and all necessary documents are completed, such as Letter of Employment and Medical Examinations, the crew needs to self-quarantine and get tested for Covid-19. If the PCR test is negative the crew member will be allowed to travel back to the ship. There will be two additional quarantines before the crew member is allowed to work, one in a hotel near the port and another onboard the ship. After completing the quarantine period onboard, the crew member will be tested once again and if the PCR test is negative means he/she is ready to work.  Each crew member needs to take these steps very seriously in order to safeguard his own safety, as well as the safety of the fellow crew and ultimately not to compromise the restart of the cruise industry. 

Read more….

 

Here are the top findings from CLIA’s 2021 Industry Outlook report

The cruise industry is poised for a recovery year in 2021, with two out of three cruisers willing to sail again within a year.  The findings were unveiled in CLIA’s newly released ‘2021 State of the Cruise Industry Outlook’ report, which also found that 58% of international vacations who have never cruised before will likely cruise in the next few years.  These are welcoming findings following a devastating impact of COVID-19 in 2020.  “2020 was a year unlike any other and I am proud of how our industry has united together to weather this unparalleled pandemic,” said Adam Goldstein, CLIA Chairman. “As we look to 2021, I know that cruisers are eager to set sail once more, just as our industry is eager to put people back to work and create unforgettable experiences for our valued guests.”  Here are additional findings from the report…. 

Read more

Cruise Ships Back In-Service January 2021 Update

A number of cruise ships are sailing globally in January as the industry continues its restart, in a staggered phased-in approach with an emphasis on regional startups.  Here are the cruise ships currently back in service or planning restarts in January 2021…

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

January 18, 2021

What Cruise Lines Need to Get Right in 2021

Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue
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