Issue #

142

|

Volume

8

July 24, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Windstar Cruises’ New Initiative: Beyond Ordinary Care
  • 'A moral obligation': radical reform urged before cruise ships allowed to return to Australia
  • Hurtigruten Captain, passengers share impressions of 'first international cruise' since quarantine
  • River Cruising Returning to Australia
  • Hapag-Lloyd to Accelerate Bremen’s Retirement
  • Which Cruise Ship Would You Buy?
  • Early for Protocols for U.S. Cruising, Says Donald
  • Bahamas Paradise Pushes Restart to October 1
  • Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV) First Major Line to go into Administration
  • Bahamas bans visitors from the United States due to spike in COVID-19 cases
  • Cruise ships pose risk for 'amplified,' 'scattered' COVID-19 community spread, CDC official says
  • Construction of the biggest cruise ship ever delayed by pandemic
  • Cruise ship rivals team up for post-COVID comeback
  • Onboard Helicopters Key to Quark Greenland Itinerary
  • River cruises exempt from blanket travel ban following pressure from Telegraph
  • Royal Caribbean’s Spectrum of the Seas to be based in Hong Kong December 2021-January 2022
  • Can a River Cruise Still be Fun in the Age of Covid-19?
  • Freeport On Two Week Lock Down, Strictly Enforced

Cover Image by:

Windstar Cruises’ New Initiative: Beyond Ordinary Care

“The Beyond Ordinary Care program adds new air filters and sanitation procedures to the fleet of six cruise ships

Windstar Cruises will retrofit their fleet of six ships with hospital-grade HEPA filters, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and will practice a safe sanitization formula used in the healthcare industry. The initiative also involves a new partnership with the epidemiology department at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center provides ongoing guidance in matters related to guest health and safety.  “We are taking extensive measures and making multi-million-dollar investments to operate our yachts more safely in this new environment,” said Windstar Cruises CEO Andrew Todd. “Building upon Windstar’s 180 degrees from ordinary service, the Beyond Ordinary Care program implements a layered system of science-led best practices aimed at keeping everyone aboard healthy.” The University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center, known for its expertise in infectious disease epidemiology, made a fitting partner for the cruise line.  “Windstar’s holistic approach has multiple layers of safety at hospital grade standards, and when combined with responsible hygiene practices from guests, it’s the safest environment achievable with tech and science as we know it today,” said Dr. Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention at University of Colorado Hospital and Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center. “When you’re sailing on a Windstar yacht, your biggest worry should be how to avoid a sunburn, not getting COVID-19.” ” 

Read more

 

'A moral obligation': radical reform urged before cruise ships allowed to return to Australia

“Cruise ships and their crews have been largely out of sight and mind since being ordered out of Australian territorial waters in March. As the ill-fated Ruby Princess finally left its temporary berth in Port Kembla on 23 April with only the crew on board, the last thing on anyone’s mind was an imminent return of paying passengers on cruises heading to Australian ports. But now tickets are on sale for cruises that sail as soon as September, raising urgent questions about the future of the industry. Australia’s international cruise ship ban is now due to end on 17 September, after being extended by three months last week. One of the first ships scheduled to arrive in Australian ports is Royal Caribbean’s Ovation of the Seas, which is scheduled to leave Hawaii on 27 September, bound for Sydney. In April the ship was linked to a significant Australian Covid-19 cluster and at least two deaths, and was among more than a dozen ships that anchored off the coast of Australia in a stand-off with authorities after the order to leave.”

Read more

 

Hurtigruten captain, passengers share impressions of 'first international cruise' since quarantine

“Imagine being on the first cruise to sail since the coronavirus shut down that entire industry for nearly four months. Hurtigruten Expedition Cruises' Benny Didriksen knows: He was a captain on the MS Fridtjof Nansen for what the Norway-based cruise line says was the first international cruise since to sail since the worldwide lockdown. "It’s a happy happening," Didriksen told USA TODAY shortly after returning from the cruise. "The world is slowly getting back (to normal) again." Shortly after Norway made the declaration to allow international cruises in its territorial waters again, Hurtigruten had itineraries ready, the cruise line's vice president of global communications, Rune Thomas Ege, told USA  TODAY. The company, which is based in Tromso, had been in close contact with German and Norwegian authorities as Hurtigruten approached their return to international waters.”

Read more

 River Cruising Returning to Australia

“Australian cruise operator Captain Cook Cruises is returning their river cruise operations back to normal starting June 23rd on Australia’s Murray River. The 7-night ‘Welcome Back’ cruise on board the beautiful paddlewheel river ship PS Murray Princess from Renmark to Mannum in the Australian state of Victoria will be one of the first to set sail in the country since the industry-wide shut down in March. Captain Cook Cruises isn’t the first river cruise line to have a restart plan ready to go. Earlier this month, A-ROSA River Cruises announced their river cruise ship ALVA will recommence operation on June 17th for all sailings along Portugal’s Douro River. Itineraries on the Rhine and Danube in Germany restart on the 19th and 20th of June.”

Read more

 

Hapag-Lloyd to Accelerate Bremen’s Retirement

“The 1990-built Bremen will not sail for Hapag-Lloyd Cruises again, the company announced. While some of the brand’s ships are returning to service later this month, the 155-guest vessel is currently out of the plans. Sold to Scylla in 2019, the Bremen was previously scheduled to leave the fleet in May 2021. Once delivered to Scylla, the ship will split time on charter to VIVA Cruises as well as Polar Latitudes.  According to the cruise line, the coronavirus pandemic hasn’t helped. The company did not say if Scylla would now take delivery of the ship earlier. “The conditions on board currently do not allow the applicable social distancing and hygiene rules to be implemented. So, it's goodbye,” the company said, in a statement. Currently docked in Rostock, Germany, the Bremen has been in service with Hapag-Lloyd since 1993. It was scheduled to sail in Antarctica during the 2020-2021 season.” 

Read more…

 

Which Cruise Ship Would You Buy?

“What a vacation it would be. No lines at the water slides, no waiting to tender and certainly no mad scramble to secure the last open deck chair. That’s what your cruise vacation would look like if you were to purchase one of the cruise ships currently for sale from Carnival Corporation. As we reported earlier this month, Carnival Corporation is planning on selling 13 ships, or 9% of their fleet, prior to the restart of cruising sometime later this fall. We already know that Costa Victoria and P&O Oceana have been sold, the first for scrap and the second to an unnamed buyer for purposes we don’t yet know, but there are more to come.  Rumors are swirling that two more ships, Carnival Fantasy and Carnival Inspiration, are both being sold for scrap, but no official announcement has been made. Both ships were launched in the 1990’s, meaning that perhaps Carnival doesn’t see ships with 20+ years of service as financially viable to operate moving forward.”

Read more

 

Early for Protocols for U.S. Cruising, Says Donald

“Without guests sailing from U.S. ports and a surge in COVID-19 cases in some parts of North America, Arnold Donald, CEO of Carnival Corporation, said it’s not the right time to be releasing health protocols. “We are all working on it. Internally, I assume (the CDC) are looking at things as well. The time will come when the U.S. society is in a better place to be socially gathering,” he told Cruise Industry News. “I think we’ve got to let this thing play out a bit so we are thinking about it in the right context at the right time."

“Having said that, we are engaged with scientists and medical experts around the world, and we continue to reach out to the CDC as well, to make certain we are informed to develop protocols just as we did in Germany.”

Germany is where cruising is about to get going, as Carnival’s AIDA brand is set to have three ships back sailing in August.” 

Read more

 

Bahamas Paradise Pushes Restart to October 1

“Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line today announced an extended delay to the resumption of its sailing operations. “As you know, we recently announced that we would finally return to sea this August – offering travelers the chance to enjoy a much-needed, two-night getaway to paradise. However, given the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) extension of its No Sail Order, we have no choice but to delay our resumption of cruise operations to October 1st, 2020," said Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line CEO Oneil Khosa. "Since the outbreak of COVID-19, we have remained one of the few cruise lines that reported no cases of the virus onboard our ships. We have also followed all required guidelines, including adhering to strict requirements for our onboard crew members, and installed the best safety protocols in the industry across our fleet to protect our guests and crew, who are always our top priority. In addition, we remain the only cruise line in the country to receive “green status” from the CDC on our No Sail Response plan, meaning we have met their requirements in providing a safe environment for our crew members to work and disembark via commercial travel. This was also recognized in the CDC’s own statement.” 

Read more

 

Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV) First Major Line to go into Administration

“The British-based line, which had a big following among Australian cruisers, had been struggling to find financial backing during the pandemic. The news throws into limbo hundreds of cruises, and its deals to purchase two P&O Australia vessels. The cruise line’s Australian website says: We are sorry to inform you that South Quay Travel Limited (SQTL) – which traded under Cruise & Maritime Voyages – was placed into administration on 20 July 2020. Paul Williams, Phil Dakin and Edward Bines of Duff & Phelps Ltd. were appointed Joint Administrators of SQTL in the UK. At present the Administrators are evaluating SQTL’s financial position. The information below sets out specific advice for Australian-based retail customers (Customers) to follow depending on what holiday and travel arrangements you have booked and how you paid for them. Please be aware that all bookings that have not taken place are cancelled.”  

Read more…

 

Bahamas bans visitors from the United States due to spike in COVID-19 cases

“Just 3 weeks after having opened borders to international travellers, the Bahamas banned visitors from the United States due to a spike in Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases. In a national address made Sunday evening, July 19, Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said the new rule would go into effect on Wednesday, July 22, at midnight. “Regrettably,” he said, the situation here at home has already deteriorated since we began the reopening of our domestic economy. It has deteriorated at an exponential rate since we reopened our international borders.”  “Commercial vessels carrying passengers will not be able to enter our borders,” the minister said.  Visitors from Canada and Europe will still be permitted to enter the Bahamas as long as they have tested negative for the virus within ten days before their arrival and have the appropriate paperwork to prove as much.” 

Read more

 

Cruise ships pose risk for 'amplified,' 'scattered' COVID-19 community spread, CDC official says

“Cruise ships' close-contact environments increase the risk of spreading infectious diseases as we've been reminded by multiple COVID-19 outbreaks on ships this year. And the risk of spreading disease doesn't stop when passengers disembark. Along with last week's announcement that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would suspend sailings through the end of September, the agency also shared some sobering data about COVID-19 outbreaks on cruise ships. Most strikingly, it revealed the breadth of contact tracing that was done after some 11,000 passengers and crew members left ships that experienced outbreaks. The CDC said in its report that the legwork required "countless hours" of work by public health officials – even more than flight contact investigations. The report noted the CDC has expended an estimated 38,000 person-hours on the COVID-19 cruise ship response since March 14, though it's unclear how many of those were devoted to contact tracing.”

Read more

 

Construction of the biggest cruise ship ever delayed by pandemic

“The debut of what is expected to be the largest cruise ship ever built has been delayed. Citing the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Royal Caribbean this week said its newest Oasis Class ship, Wonder of the Seas, would no longer begin operations in China in 2021. The line didn’t give a new timetable for the rollout of the vessel. “The construction of (Wonder of the Seas) was delayed due to the impact (on) the shipyard operation,” the line said in a statement posted in Chinese on its Chinese website, according to a translation. “However, we look forward to the arrival of (Wonder of the Seas) after the epidemic has been brought under control as soon as possible.” ”

Read more...

 

Cruise ship rivals team up for post-COVID comeback

“The bruised and battered cruise ship industry is already planning for a post-lockdown world, with two rival companies joining forces to plot a way forward. Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line have together established the Healthy Sail Panel, a group of experts who, it's claimed, will find a COVID-safe way to take to the high seas once more.” 

Read more

 

Onboard Helicopters Key to Quark Greenland Itinerary

“Quark Expeditions has introduced a new expedition program in Greenland capitalizing on the Ultramarine's two twin-engine helicopters, dual heli-decks and a first-ever partnership with local communities in South Greenland that will offer off-ship adventure options (included in the trip package) exclusive to the company, according to a press release. The ship is set to launch later this year with two twin-engine helicopters, 20 quick-launching Zodiacs and more, which has enabled Quark Expeditions to offer a new Greenland program in partnership with municipal, regional and national partners, including Tasermiut, a leading outdoor adventure specialist in South Greenland.” 

Read more

 

River cruises exempt from blanket travel ban following pressure from Telegraph

“River cruises are not covered by the blanket guidance advising against cruise ship travel, the Foreign Office (FCO) has confirmed, paving the way for Britons to enjoy a holiday on the water this summer. The updated guidelines, which previously only stated that the FCO “advises against cruise ship travel at this time”, now make clear that cruise ship travel is defined as “staying overnight for at least one night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households.”  Voyages on rivers are generally considered more low-risk than rather than ocean cruises. They tend to be shorter itineraries, sailing only in one or two countries, and have fewer passengers on board, which mean new health and safety protocols are easier to manage...”  

Read more

 

Royal Caribbean’s Spectrum of the Seas to be based in Hong Kong December 2021-January 2022

“Over a couple of months from December 2021 through January 2022, Royal Caribbean International’s 4,180-berth Spectrum of the Seas is due to be based in Hong Kong China, operating 4- to 9-night voyages to Japan, Vietnam, and other cruise ports. Returning for her 9th season in Asia, the line's 3,114-berth Voyager of the Seas will be based in Tianjin (Beijing, China), from May through October 2021. The 22-year-old vessel will offer 4- to 7-night sailings to 10 different destinations in Japan (including Kagoshima, Kumamoto, Fukuoka, Nagasaki). Royal Caribbean called its Voyager an “old friend” of the cruise market, highlighting a recent US$100 million refit.”

Read more

 

PONANT's L’Austral is the first French cruise ship to take to sea after confinement

“The first French cruise ship taking to the seas since confinement due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis returned to Port Marseille-Fos France after a 7-day roundtrip along France's Atlantic coast.  PONANT's ship L’Austral took only 40 passengers on this voyage - for the first time since the lockdown ended.  The premium brand PONANT is also running cruises with roundtrips out of Bordeaux, Nice (Villefranche-sur-Mer), Le Havre (Paris) and Saint-Malo. Strict Coronavirus-related onboard health protocols were in place, including guests being asked to take tests prior departure, having their temperature taken, social distancing measures.”  

Read more

 

TUI Cruises Postpones Restart of Mein Schiff 1 - Start Up Team Not Completed

“TUI Cruises is canceling the announced restart of the cruise ship Mein Schiff 1, who was scheduled to resume cruises on July 31, according to the German media. The popular cruise blog Schiffe und Kreuzfahrten reports that the reason for canceling the first “Blue Cruise” is because the company has a problem bringing back crew on board on time due to global travel restrictions. “Due to the worldwide travel restrictions, the start-up team of Mein Schiff 1 is not yet completely on board. Therefore, contrary to the original planning, Mein Schiff 1 will sail from August 3, 2020. All booked guests of the "Blue Cruise" from July 31. We will inform you until August 3, 2020, and receive an attractive alternative offer to come on board.” announced TUI Cruises.” 

Read more...

 

Can a River Cruise Still be Fun in the Age of Covid-19?

“Up until last Thursday, when the U.K. Foreign Office changed its advice on river cruising, the only nationalities allowed on a river cruise in Europe were Germans, sailing on German lines. So we asked the editor of Germany-based website cruisetricks.de to tell us what it was like onboard one of the very first river cruises to restart after cruise operations were suspended worldwide.” 

Read more

 

Freeport On Two Week Lock Down, Strictly Enforced

“With the current health crisis once again hitting Grand Bahama Island, Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis announced on Tuesday morning that the island would begin a two-week lockdown, effective at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 23. The lockdown will be in effect until Friday, August 7, at 5 a.m.  The news comes after the minister spoke on Sunday, limiting the entry of U.S. citizens into The Bahamas.  During a national address Monday morning which was carried on various social media platforms, he delivered the sobering news to residents. “You should not leave home this week unless you have to purchase food, medicine, or if you are an essential worker, he declared.”

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


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Issue #

142

|

Volume

8

July 24, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Windstar Cruises’ New Initiative: Beyond Ordinary Care
  • 'A moral obligation': radical reform urged before cruise ships allowed to return to Australia
  • Hurtigruten Captain, passengers share impressions of 'first international cruise' since quarantine
  • River Cruising Returning to Australia
  • Hapag-Lloyd to Accelerate Bremen’s Retirement
  • Which Cruise Ship Would You Buy?
  • Early for Protocols for U.S. Cruising, Says Donald
  • Bahamas Paradise Pushes Restart to October 1
  • Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV) First Major Line to go into Administration
  • Bahamas bans visitors from the United States due to spike in COVID-19 cases
  • Cruise ships pose risk for 'amplified,' 'scattered' COVID-19 community spread, CDC official says
  • Construction of the biggest cruise ship ever delayed by pandemic
  • Cruise ship rivals team up for post-COVID comeback
  • Onboard Helicopters Key to Quark Greenland Itinerary
  • River cruises exempt from blanket travel ban following pressure from Telegraph
  • Royal Caribbean’s Spectrum of the Seas to be based in Hong Kong December 2021-January 2022
  • Can a River Cruise Still be Fun in the Age of Covid-19?
  • Freeport On Two Week Lock Down, Strictly Enforced

Cover Image by:

Windstar Cruises’ New Initiative: Beyond Ordinary Care

“The Beyond Ordinary Care program adds new air filters and sanitation procedures to the fleet of six cruise ships

Windstar Cruises will retrofit their fleet of six ships with hospital-grade HEPA filters, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and will practice a safe sanitization formula used in the healthcare industry. The initiative also involves a new partnership with the epidemiology department at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center provides ongoing guidance in matters related to guest health and safety.  “We are taking extensive measures and making multi-million-dollar investments to operate our yachts more safely in this new environment,” said Windstar Cruises CEO Andrew Todd. “Building upon Windstar’s 180 degrees from ordinary service, the Beyond Ordinary Care program implements a layered system of science-led best practices aimed at keeping everyone aboard healthy.” The University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center, known for its expertise in infectious disease epidemiology, made a fitting partner for the cruise line.  “Windstar’s holistic approach has multiple layers of safety at hospital grade standards, and when combined with responsible hygiene practices from guests, it’s the safest environment achievable with tech and science as we know it today,” said Dr. Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection Prevention at University of Colorado Hospital and Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Center. “When you’re sailing on a Windstar yacht, your biggest worry should be how to avoid a sunburn, not getting COVID-19.” ” 

Read more

 

'A moral obligation': radical reform urged before cruise ships allowed to return to Australia

“Cruise ships and their crews have been largely out of sight and mind since being ordered out of Australian territorial waters in March. As the ill-fated Ruby Princess finally left its temporary berth in Port Kembla on 23 April with only the crew on board, the last thing on anyone’s mind was an imminent return of paying passengers on cruises heading to Australian ports. But now tickets are on sale for cruises that sail as soon as September, raising urgent questions about the future of the industry. Australia’s international cruise ship ban is now due to end on 17 September, after being extended by three months last week. One of the first ships scheduled to arrive in Australian ports is Royal Caribbean’s Ovation of the Seas, which is scheduled to leave Hawaii on 27 September, bound for Sydney. In April the ship was linked to a significant Australian Covid-19 cluster and at least two deaths, and was among more than a dozen ships that anchored off the coast of Australia in a stand-off with authorities after the order to leave.”

Read more

 

Hurtigruten captain, passengers share impressions of 'first international cruise' since quarantine

“Imagine being on the first cruise to sail since the coronavirus shut down that entire industry for nearly four months. Hurtigruten Expedition Cruises' Benny Didriksen knows: He was a captain on the MS Fridtjof Nansen for what the Norway-based cruise line says was the first international cruise since to sail since the worldwide lockdown. "It’s a happy happening," Didriksen told USA TODAY shortly after returning from the cruise. "The world is slowly getting back (to normal) again." Shortly after Norway made the declaration to allow international cruises in its territorial waters again, Hurtigruten had itineraries ready, the cruise line's vice president of global communications, Rune Thomas Ege, told USA  TODAY. The company, which is based in Tromso, had been in close contact with German and Norwegian authorities as Hurtigruten approached their return to international waters.”

Read more

 River Cruising Returning to Australia

“Australian cruise operator Captain Cook Cruises is returning their river cruise operations back to normal starting June 23rd on Australia’s Murray River. The 7-night ‘Welcome Back’ cruise on board the beautiful paddlewheel river ship PS Murray Princess from Renmark to Mannum in the Australian state of Victoria will be one of the first to set sail in the country since the industry-wide shut down in March. Captain Cook Cruises isn’t the first river cruise line to have a restart plan ready to go. Earlier this month, A-ROSA River Cruises announced their river cruise ship ALVA will recommence operation on June 17th for all sailings along Portugal’s Douro River. Itineraries on the Rhine and Danube in Germany restart on the 19th and 20th of June.”

Read more

 

Hapag-Lloyd to Accelerate Bremen’s Retirement

“The 1990-built Bremen will not sail for Hapag-Lloyd Cruises again, the company announced. While some of the brand’s ships are returning to service later this month, the 155-guest vessel is currently out of the plans. Sold to Scylla in 2019, the Bremen was previously scheduled to leave the fleet in May 2021. Once delivered to Scylla, the ship will split time on charter to VIVA Cruises as well as Polar Latitudes.  According to the cruise line, the coronavirus pandemic hasn’t helped. The company did not say if Scylla would now take delivery of the ship earlier. “The conditions on board currently do not allow the applicable social distancing and hygiene rules to be implemented. So, it's goodbye,” the company said, in a statement. Currently docked in Rostock, Germany, the Bremen has been in service with Hapag-Lloyd since 1993. It was scheduled to sail in Antarctica during the 2020-2021 season.” 

Read more…

 

Which Cruise Ship Would You Buy?

“What a vacation it would be. No lines at the water slides, no waiting to tender and certainly no mad scramble to secure the last open deck chair. That’s what your cruise vacation would look like if you were to purchase one of the cruise ships currently for sale from Carnival Corporation. As we reported earlier this month, Carnival Corporation is planning on selling 13 ships, or 9% of their fleet, prior to the restart of cruising sometime later this fall. We already know that Costa Victoria and P&O Oceana have been sold, the first for scrap and the second to an unnamed buyer for purposes we don’t yet know, but there are more to come.  Rumors are swirling that two more ships, Carnival Fantasy and Carnival Inspiration, are both being sold for scrap, but no official announcement has been made. Both ships were launched in the 1990’s, meaning that perhaps Carnival doesn’t see ships with 20+ years of service as financially viable to operate moving forward.”

Read more

 

Early for Protocols for U.S. Cruising, Says Donald

“Without guests sailing from U.S. ports and a surge in COVID-19 cases in some parts of North America, Arnold Donald, CEO of Carnival Corporation, said it’s not the right time to be releasing health protocols. “We are all working on it. Internally, I assume (the CDC) are looking at things as well. The time will come when the U.S. society is in a better place to be socially gathering,” he told Cruise Industry News. “I think we’ve got to let this thing play out a bit so we are thinking about it in the right context at the right time."

“Having said that, we are engaged with scientists and medical experts around the world, and we continue to reach out to the CDC as well, to make certain we are informed to develop protocols just as we did in Germany.”

Germany is where cruising is about to get going, as Carnival’s AIDA brand is set to have three ships back sailing in August.” 

Read more

 

Bahamas Paradise Pushes Restart to October 1

“Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line today announced an extended delay to the resumption of its sailing operations. “As you know, we recently announced that we would finally return to sea this August – offering travelers the chance to enjoy a much-needed, two-night getaway to paradise. However, given the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) extension of its No Sail Order, we have no choice but to delay our resumption of cruise operations to October 1st, 2020," said Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line CEO Oneil Khosa. "Since the outbreak of COVID-19, we have remained one of the few cruise lines that reported no cases of the virus onboard our ships. We have also followed all required guidelines, including adhering to strict requirements for our onboard crew members, and installed the best safety protocols in the industry across our fleet to protect our guests and crew, who are always our top priority. In addition, we remain the only cruise line in the country to receive “green status” from the CDC on our No Sail Response plan, meaning we have met their requirements in providing a safe environment for our crew members to work and disembark via commercial travel. This was also recognized in the CDC’s own statement.” 

Read more

 

Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV) First Major Line to go into Administration

“The British-based line, which had a big following among Australian cruisers, had been struggling to find financial backing during the pandemic. The news throws into limbo hundreds of cruises, and its deals to purchase two P&O Australia vessels. The cruise line’s Australian website says: We are sorry to inform you that South Quay Travel Limited (SQTL) – which traded under Cruise & Maritime Voyages – was placed into administration on 20 July 2020. Paul Williams, Phil Dakin and Edward Bines of Duff & Phelps Ltd. were appointed Joint Administrators of SQTL in the UK. At present the Administrators are evaluating SQTL’s financial position. The information below sets out specific advice for Australian-based retail customers (Customers) to follow depending on what holiday and travel arrangements you have booked and how you paid for them. Please be aware that all bookings that have not taken place are cancelled.”  

Read more…

 

Bahamas bans visitors from the United States due to spike in COVID-19 cases

“Just 3 weeks after having opened borders to international travellers, the Bahamas banned visitors from the United States due to a spike in Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases. In a national address made Sunday evening, July 19, Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said the new rule would go into effect on Wednesday, July 22, at midnight. “Regrettably,” he said, the situation here at home has already deteriorated since we began the reopening of our domestic economy. It has deteriorated at an exponential rate since we reopened our international borders.”  “Commercial vessels carrying passengers will not be able to enter our borders,” the minister said.  Visitors from Canada and Europe will still be permitted to enter the Bahamas as long as they have tested negative for the virus within ten days before their arrival and have the appropriate paperwork to prove as much.” 

Read more

 

Cruise ships pose risk for 'amplified,' 'scattered' COVID-19 community spread, CDC official says

“Cruise ships' close-contact environments increase the risk of spreading infectious diseases as we've been reminded by multiple COVID-19 outbreaks on ships this year. And the risk of spreading disease doesn't stop when passengers disembark. Along with last week's announcement that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would suspend sailings through the end of September, the agency also shared some sobering data about COVID-19 outbreaks on cruise ships. Most strikingly, it revealed the breadth of contact tracing that was done after some 11,000 passengers and crew members left ships that experienced outbreaks. The CDC said in its report that the legwork required "countless hours" of work by public health officials – even more than flight contact investigations. The report noted the CDC has expended an estimated 38,000 person-hours on the COVID-19 cruise ship response since March 14, though it's unclear how many of those were devoted to contact tracing.”

Read more

 

Construction of the biggest cruise ship ever delayed by pandemic

“The debut of what is expected to be the largest cruise ship ever built has been delayed. Citing the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Royal Caribbean this week said its newest Oasis Class ship, Wonder of the Seas, would no longer begin operations in China in 2021. The line didn’t give a new timetable for the rollout of the vessel. “The construction of (Wonder of the Seas) was delayed due to the impact (on) the shipyard operation,” the line said in a statement posted in Chinese on its Chinese website, according to a translation. “However, we look forward to the arrival of (Wonder of the Seas) after the epidemic has been brought under control as soon as possible.” ”

Read more...

 

Cruise ship rivals team up for post-COVID comeback

“The bruised and battered cruise ship industry is already planning for a post-lockdown world, with two rival companies joining forces to plot a way forward. Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line have together established the Healthy Sail Panel, a group of experts who, it's claimed, will find a COVID-safe way to take to the high seas once more.” 

Read more

 

Onboard Helicopters Key to Quark Greenland Itinerary

“Quark Expeditions has introduced a new expedition program in Greenland capitalizing on the Ultramarine's two twin-engine helicopters, dual heli-decks and a first-ever partnership with local communities in South Greenland that will offer off-ship adventure options (included in the trip package) exclusive to the company, according to a press release. The ship is set to launch later this year with two twin-engine helicopters, 20 quick-launching Zodiacs and more, which has enabled Quark Expeditions to offer a new Greenland program in partnership with municipal, regional and national partners, including Tasermiut, a leading outdoor adventure specialist in South Greenland.” 

Read more

 

River cruises exempt from blanket travel ban following pressure from Telegraph

“River cruises are not covered by the blanket guidance advising against cruise ship travel, the Foreign Office (FCO) has confirmed, paving the way for Britons to enjoy a holiday on the water this summer. The updated guidelines, which previously only stated that the FCO “advises against cruise ship travel at this time”, now make clear that cruise ship travel is defined as “staying overnight for at least one night on a sea-going cruise ship with people from multiple households.”  Voyages on rivers are generally considered more low-risk than rather than ocean cruises. They tend to be shorter itineraries, sailing only in one or two countries, and have fewer passengers on board, which mean new health and safety protocols are easier to manage...”  

Read more

 

Royal Caribbean’s Spectrum of the Seas to be based in Hong Kong December 2021-January 2022

“Over a couple of months from December 2021 through January 2022, Royal Caribbean International’s 4,180-berth Spectrum of the Seas is due to be based in Hong Kong China, operating 4- to 9-night voyages to Japan, Vietnam, and other cruise ports. Returning for her 9th season in Asia, the line's 3,114-berth Voyager of the Seas will be based in Tianjin (Beijing, China), from May through October 2021. The 22-year-old vessel will offer 4- to 7-night sailings to 10 different destinations in Japan (including Kagoshima, Kumamoto, Fukuoka, Nagasaki). Royal Caribbean called its Voyager an “old friend” of the cruise market, highlighting a recent US$100 million refit.”

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PONANT's L’Austral is the first French cruise ship to take to sea after confinement

“The first French cruise ship taking to the seas since confinement due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis returned to Port Marseille-Fos France after a 7-day roundtrip along France's Atlantic coast.  PONANT's ship L’Austral took only 40 passengers on this voyage - for the first time since the lockdown ended.  The premium brand PONANT is also running cruises with roundtrips out of Bordeaux, Nice (Villefranche-sur-Mer), Le Havre (Paris) and Saint-Malo. Strict Coronavirus-related onboard health protocols were in place, including guests being asked to take tests prior departure, having their temperature taken, social distancing measures.”  

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TUI Cruises Postpones Restart of Mein Schiff 1 - Start Up Team Not Completed

“TUI Cruises is canceling the announced restart of the cruise ship Mein Schiff 1, who was scheduled to resume cruises on July 31, according to the German media. The popular cruise blog Schiffe und Kreuzfahrten reports that the reason for canceling the first “Blue Cruise” is because the company has a problem bringing back crew on board on time due to global travel restrictions. “Due to the worldwide travel restrictions, the start-up team of Mein Schiff 1 is not yet completely on board. Therefore, contrary to the original planning, Mein Schiff 1 will sail from August 3, 2020. All booked guests of the "Blue Cruise" from July 31. We will inform you until August 3, 2020, and receive an attractive alternative offer to come on board.” announced TUI Cruises.” 

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Can a River Cruise Still be Fun in the Age of Covid-19?

“Up until last Thursday, when the U.K. Foreign Office changed its advice on river cruising, the only nationalities allowed on a river cruise in Europe were Germans, sailing on German lines. So we asked the editor of Germany-based website cruisetricks.de to tell us what it was like onboard one of the very first river cruises to restart after cruise operations were suspended worldwide.” 

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Freeport On Two Week Lock Down, Strictly Enforced

“With the current health crisis once again hitting Grand Bahama Island, Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis announced on Tuesday morning that the island would begin a two-week lockdown, effective at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 23. The lockdown will be in effect until Friday, August 7, at 5 a.m.  The news comes after the minister spoke on Sunday, limiting the entry of U.S. citizens into The Bahamas.  During a national address Monday morning which was carried on various social media platforms, he delivered the sobering news to residents. “You should not leave home this week unless you have to purchase food, medicine, or if you are an essential worker, he declared.”

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter


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July 24, 2020

Windstar Cruises’ New Initiative: Beyond Ordinary Care

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