Issue #

127

|

Volume

7

July 1, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Wollongong teenager recalls 70-day ordeal trapped on coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off Barbados
  • Cruise Industry Downsizing Begins with First Sale of a Ship for Scrap
  • How cruise ship industry plans to get passengers back on board after coronavirus crisis
  • Choppy waters ahead for cruise industry
  • Cruise ships regularly flouted NSW Government's coronavirus advice, Ruby Princess inquiry hears
  • Chaos on ‘Enchantment of the Seas’
  • A cruise with no port calls? In the new era of COVID, one line is about to try it
  • First Cruise Line Back at Sea with Passengers
  • Maldives to Welcome Cruise Ships Once Again

Cover Image by:

Wollongong teenager recalls 70-day ordeal trapped on coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off Barbados

“A Wollongong teenager who spent 70 days trapped on a coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off the coast of Barbados has returned home to Australia.  Soraya Zapata, 18, thought she was embarking on the adventure of a lifetime after signing a contract to be a dancer on Royal Caribbean cruise ship Serenade of the Seas late last year.  But just six weeks into her dream job everything changed.” 

Read more….

 

Cruise Industry Downsizing Begins with First Sale of a Ship for Scrap

“The cruise industry is beginning a downsizing the likes of which have never been seen in the modern cruise business. While other segments of the shipping industry have experienced significant downturns prompting the wholesale scrapping of vessels, cruise shipping up until now has been on a continuous growth path.  Faced with no definitive timeline for a return to service and uncertainty over the rate at which travelers will return to cruising, the cruise lines are struggling to improve their liquidity and reduce their monthly cash burn. Carnival Cruise Line in its preliminary second quarter update reported that by extending maturities on its debt, reducing capital expenditures, employment, and operating costs, that it had lowered its monthly burn rate to $650 million from approximately $1 billion. Royal Caribbean Cruise Line is burning between $250 and $275 million a month.  Faced with the need to further lower expenses the cruise lines are now reportedly looking at their primary asset and expense, which are their ships. Carnival announced on June 18, that, “The company already has preliminary agreements for the disposal of 6 ships which are expected to leave the fleet in the next 90 days and is currently working toward additional agreements.” ” 

Read more

 

How cruise ship industry plans to get passengers back on board after coronavirus crisis

-     “Operators aim to rebuild trust with health measures that’ll include shorter trips, pre-embarkation health screenings and social distancing

-       To jump-start the industry, cruise lines are offering easy itinerary changes and deep discounts to attract travellers back to sea

Hongkonger Eric Lee Tsun-lung has been on more than 50 ocean cruises since he was a youngster and looks forward to going to sea again soon, regardless of the spate of coronavirus outbreaks on cruise liners, frequently dubbed “floating Petri dishes” by commentators. The 36-year-old joined his first cruise in 1994 with his parents. He remembers it well; a three-day and two-night stay on the Star Pisces, operated by Star Cruises, from Hong Kong to Xiamen in southeast China’s Fujian province. “I love everything about cruising,” says Lee, who works in human resources. He enjoyed that first cruise so much that, as soon as he grew up, he started planning a fly-cruise trip to the United States and Europe. These days, he likes heading to Europe “for the culture”, but his favourite destination is the Caribbean for its beaches, and his favourite operator is Royal Caribbean. The length of time he spends cruising the oceans each year has increased as time has passed. “I plan to cruise every year, at least one long haul to the USA-Europe and one short cruise in Asia,” he says.” 

Read more

 

Choppy waters ahead for cruise industry

“Some cruise lines are hoping to set sail later this summer but with images of coronavirus-ravaged ships still fresh in many minds, the industry could face years of choppy water ahead. The global cruise industry expected to carry 32 million passengers and take in $71 billion in revenue this year. That will fall by at least 50% this year, says Euromonitor International, a consulting firm. It took the industry three years to recover from the 2009 recession; this time, it will take longer, Euromonitor analyst Alex Jarman said. “Unlike the previous downturn, the pandemic has put the safety of cruises into question,” Jarman said. Cruise lines stopped sailing in mid-March after several high-profile outbreaks at sea. More than 600 people felt ill aboard Carnival Corp.’s Diamond Princess while it was quarantined off the coast of Japan, for example. Fourteen passengers died. Christina Kerby was trapped aboard a Holland America cruise ship in February after several ports in Asia refused to allow it to dock. “I will take a cruise again someday,” said Kerby, of Alameda, California. “Just not anytime soon.” Since they stopped sailing, Carnival, Royal Caribbean International and Norwegian Cruise Line — which control 75% of the market — have furloughed thousands of staff and obtained billions in bank loans to stay afloat. Major cruise companies weren’t eligible for U.S. government loans because they’re incorporated overseas.” 

Read more…

 

Cruise ships regularly flouted NSW Government's coronavirus advice, Ruby Princess inquiry hears

“A senior NSW Health physician has told the Ruby Princess inquiry it "was not unusual" for cruise ships to defy government requests to collect coronavirus swabs in the early stages of the pandemic. By late February, the state's chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant had written to the cruise industry with guidelines calling for COVID-19 swabs to also be collected when patients were tested for influenza. During a voyage that arrived in Sydney on March 8, 30 people on board had been tested for influenza after becoming sick.

But Dr Vicky Sheppeard, a NSW Health physician who sat on a risk-assessment team for that voyage, said no COVID-19 swabs were collected. "It was not unusual for the ships to not have collected any swabs," she told the inquiry.” 

Read more….

 

Chaos on ‘Enchantment of the Seas’

293 angry as quarantine extended after positive tests for Covid-19... 

There was chaos on board Royal Caribbean’s Enchantment of the Seas yesterday as the quarantine period for nationals has once again been extended.  The Ministry of Health announced via a press release yesterday that the decision was made in light of the three recent Covid-19 positive cases from this group...” 

Read more

 

A cruise with no port calls? In the new era of COVID, one line is about to try it

“Would you take a 14-day cruise that didn’t include a single port call?  That’s the temporary solution that one Europe-based cruise company has dreamed up to solve the problem of how to offer trips in an era of coronavirus-related port restrictions. Norwegian expedition cruise company Hurtigruten this week is beginning 14-day sailings from Hamburg, Germany, to the Norwegian coast that — for now — won’t include a single port stop.  The voyages, on the company’s new, 530-passenger Fridtjof Nansen, will offer passengers the opportunity to see Norway‘s famous coastal fjords, glaciers and mountains as the ship travels all the way up the coast to North Cape — one of the northernmost points in Europe. The sailings will be among the first cruises to resume anywhere in the world since cruise lines began shutting down operations in March due to the coronavirus outbreak. Many major lines around the world have canceled all or most sailings through September or beyond.” 

Read more

 

FIRST CRUISE LINE BACK AT SEA WITH PASSENGERS

“The first cruise line is back at sea and has resumed operations since the worldwide suspensions of cruising due to the Covid-19 pandemic.  SeaDream Yacht Club's ‘SeaDream 1' set sail from the picturesque city of Bergen, Norway on June 20th and will travel to Oslo, according to a company press release.  Responding to demand, the company grew capacity for the summer in Norway from one ship and nine voyages to two ships and 18 voyages, according to the press release.” 

Read more

 

Maldives to Welcome Cruise Ships Once Again

“The Government of the Maldives is allowing cruise ships to call again in August, and has released a comprehensive 28-page document, Guidelines for Restarting Tourism in the Maldives. Cruise ships and yachts arriving in the Maldives are mainly exempt from the new general tourism guidelines and must adhere to International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations and guidelines. Cruise ships and yachts will not be allowed to embark or disembark passengers on or off inhabited islands until August 1, 2020. However, embarkation and disembarkation of passengers and crew at international airports (in possession of valid air tickets if disembarking) will be permitted.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

 


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

Issue #

127

|

Volume

7

July 1, 2020

In this Issue

Here are some of the news articles we are following:

  • Wollongong teenager recalls 70-day ordeal trapped on coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off Barbados
  • Cruise Industry Downsizing Begins with First Sale of a Ship for Scrap
  • How cruise ship industry plans to get passengers back on board after coronavirus crisis
  • Choppy waters ahead for cruise industry
  • Cruise ships regularly flouted NSW Government's coronavirus advice, Ruby Princess inquiry hears
  • Chaos on ‘Enchantment of the Seas’
  • A cruise with no port calls? In the new era of COVID, one line is about to try it
  • First Cruise Line Back at Sea with Passengers
  • Maldives to Welcome Cruise Ships Once Again

Cover Image by:

Wollongong teenager recalls 70-day ordeal trapped on coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off Barbados

“A Wollongong teenager who spent 70 days trapped on a coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off the coast of Barbados has returned home to Australia.  Soraya Zapata, 18, thought she was embarking on the adventure of a lifetime after signing a contract to be a dancer on Royal Caribbean cruise ship Serenade of the Seas late last year.  But just six weeks into her dream job everything changed.” 

Read more….

 

Cruise Industry Downsizing Begins with First Sale of a Ship for Scrap

“The cruise industry is beginning a downsizing the likes of which have never been seen in the modern cruise business. While other segments of the shipping industry have experienced significant downturns prompting the wholesale scrapping of vessels, cruise shipping up until now has been on a continuous growth path.  Faced with no definitive timeline for a return to service and uncertainty over the rate at which travelers will return to cruising, the cruise lines are struggling to improve their liquidity and reduce their monthly cash burn. Carnival Cruise Line in its preliminary second quarter update reported that by extending maturities on its debt, reducing capital expenditures, employment, and operating costs, that it had lowered its monthly burn rate to $650 million from approximately $1 billion. Royal Caribbean Cruise Line is burning between $250 and $275 million a month.  Faced with the need to further lower expenses the cruise lines are now reportedly looking at their primary asset and expense, which are their ships. Carnival announced on June 18, that, “The company already has preliminary agreements for the disposal of 6 ships which are expected to leave the fleet in the next 90 days and is currently working toward additional agreements.” ” 

Read more

 

How cruise ship industry plans to get passengers back on board after coronavirus crisis

-     “Operators aim to rebuild trust with health measures that’ll include shorter trips, pre-embarkation health screenings and social distancing

-       To jump-start the industry, cruise lines are offering easy itinerary changes and deep discounts to attract travellers back to sea

Hongkonger Eric Lee Tsun-lung has been on more than 50 ocean cruises since he was a youngster and looks forward to going to sea again soon, regardless of the spate of coronavirus outbreaks on cruise liners, frequently dubbed “floating Petri dishes” by commentators. The 36-year-old joined his first cruise in 1994 with his parents. He remembers it well; a three-day and two-night stay on the Star Pisces, operated by Star Cruises, from Hong Kong to Xiamen in southeast China’s Fujian province. “I love everything about cruising,” says Lee, who works in human resources. He enjoyed that first cruise so much that, as soon as he grew up, he started planning a fly-cruise trip to the United States and Europe. These days, he likes heading to Europe “for the culture”, but his favourite destination is the Caribbean for its beaches, and his favourite operator is Royal Caribbean. The length of time he spends cruising the oceans each year has increased as time has passed. “I plan to cruise every year, at least one long haul to the USA-Europe and one short cruise in Asia,” he says.” 

Read more

 

Choppy waters ahead for cruise industry

“Some cruise lines are hoping to set sail later this summer but with images of coronavirus-ravaged ships still fresh in many minds, the industry could face years of choppy water ahead. The global cruise industry expected to carry 32 million passengers and take in $71 billion in revenue this year. That will fall by at least 50% this year, says Euromonitor International, a consulting firm. It took the industry three years to recover from the 2009 recession; this time, it will take longer, Euromonitor analyst Alex Jarman said. “Unlike the previous downturn, the pandemic has put the safety of cruises into question,” Jarman said. Cruise lines stopped sailing in mid-March after several high-profile outbreaks at sea. More than 600 people felt ill aboard Carnival Corp.’s Diamond Princess while it was quarantined off the coast of Japan, for example. Fourteen passengers died. Christina Kerby was trapped aboard a Holland America cruise ship in February after several ports in Asia refused to allow it to dock. “I will take a cruise again someday,” said Kerby, of Alameda, California. “Just not anytime soon.” Since they stopped sailing, Carnival, Royal Caribbean International and Norwegian Cruise Line — which control 75% of the market — have furloughed thousands of staff and obtained billions in bank loans to stay afloat. Major cruise companies weren’t eligible for U.S. government loans because they’re incorporated overseas.” 

Read more…

 

Cruise ships regularly flouted NSW Government's coronavirus advice, Ruby Princess inquiry hears

“A senior NSW Health physician has told the Ruby Princess inquiry it "was not unusual" for cruise ships to defy government requests to collect coronavirus swabs in the early stages of the pandemic. By late February, the state's chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant had written to the cruise industry with guidelines calling for COVID-19 swabs to also be collected when patients were tested for influenza. During a voyage that arrived in Sydney on March 8, 30 people on board had been tested for influenza after becoming sick.

But Dr Vicky Sheppeard, a NSW Health physician who sat on a risk-assessment team for that voyage, said no COVID-19 swabs were collected. "It was not unusual for the ships to not have collected any swabs," she told the inquiry.” 

Read more….

 

Chaos on ‘Enchantment of the Seas’

293 angry as quarantine extended after positive tests for Covid-19... 

There was chaos on board Royal Caribbean’s Enchantment of the Seas yesterday as the quarantine period for nationals has once again been extended.  The Ministry of Health announced via a press release yesterday that the decision was made in light of the three recent Covid-19 positive cases from this group...” 

Read more

 

A cruise with no port calls? In the new era of COVID, one line is about to try it

“Would you take a 14-day cruise that didn’t include a single port call?  That’s the temporary solution that one Europe-based cruise company has dreamed up to solve the problem of how to offer trips in an era of coronavirus-related port restrictions. Norwegian expedition cruise company Hurtigruten this week is beginning 14-day sailings from Hamburg, Germany, to the Norwegian coast that — for now — won’t include a single port stop.  The voyages, on the company’s new, 530-passenger Fridtjof Nansen, will offer passengers the opportunity to see Norway‘s famous coastal fjords, glaciers and mountains as the ship travels all the way up the coast to North Cape — one of the northernmost points in Europe. The sailings will be among the first cruises to resume anywhere in the world since cruise lines began shutting down operations in March due to the coronavirus outbreak. Many major lines around the world have canceled all or most sailings through September or beyond.” 

Read more

 

FIRST CRUISE LINE BACK AT SEA WITH PASSENGERS

“The first cruise line is back at sea and has resumed operations since the worldwide suspensions of cruising due to the Covid-19 pandemic.  SeaDream Yacht Club's ‘SeaDream 1' set sail from the picturesque city of Bergen, Norway on June 20th and will travel to Oslo, according to a company press release.  Responding to demand, the company grew capacity for the summer in Norway from one ship and nine voyages to two ships and 18 voyages, according to the press release.” 

Read more

 

Maldives to Welcome Cruise Ships Once Again

“The Government of the Maldives is allowing cruise ships to call again in August, and has released a comprehensive 28-page document, Guidelines for Restarting Tourism in the Maldives. Cruise ships and yachts arriving in the Maldives are mainly exempt from the new general tourism guidelines and must adhere to International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations and guidelines. Cruise ships and yachts will not be allowed to embark or disembark passengers on or off inhabited islands until August 1, 2020. However, embarkation and disembarkation of passengers and crew at international airports (in possession of valid air tickets if disembarking) will be permitted.” 

Read more

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this e-Newsletter

 


Having trouble reading?

Download this Issue

July 1, 2020

Wollongong teenager recalls 70-day ordeal trapped on coronavirus-riddled cruise ship off Barbados

Having trouble reading?

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